M/J Library Skills/Information Literacy (MC)   (#1100000)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

This course covers the basics of information literacy utilizing the Florida FINDS (Focus, Investigate, Note, Develop, Score) research model. Search strategies, database and website evaluation, note taking and organization, citation formats in MLA (Modern Language Association) and APA (American Psychological Association), creation of presentation products (including the utilization of various software programs for the production of multimedia), and an understanding of the meta-cognitive reflection process are an integral part of this course.

Special Note: This course may be repeated utilizing the grade level appropriate benchmarks.

General Information

Course Number: 1100000
Course Path:
Abbreviated Title: M/J LIB SKLS/IL (MC)
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 6,7,8

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Word Scholar: Using Context Clues:

Identify and apply context clues, including synonyms, antonyms, and inferences, to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in passages about the life of Frederick Douglass with this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ring the Bell: Paraphrase Like a Champion:

Learn to paraphrase grade-level content in this boxing-themed tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Paraphrase Pioneers:

Learn to paraphrase grade-level content in this tutorial that includes passages about some of America's most notable pioneers.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Planet Paraphrase - Part Two:

Learn all about the skill of paraphrasing in this two-part tutorial. You'll learn how to paraphrase effectively as you read about several of the most interesting locations on the planet.

Make sure to complete Planet Paraphrase - Part One before diving into Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Planet Paraphrase - Part One:

Learn all about the skill of paraphrasing in this two-part tutorial. You'll learn how to paraphrase effectively as you read about several of the most interesting locations on the planet. 

Make sure to complete both parts! Click here to launch Planet Paraphrase - Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

It's No Myth -- Part Two: Changing Sentences from Passive to Active Voice:

Practice changing sentences from passive to active voice in this interactive tutorial about mythical creatures.

This is Part Two in a two-part series. Make sure to complete Part One first! Click  to launch "It's No Myth -- Part One: Distinguishing Between Passive and Active Voice."  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

CER: Writing a Great Paragraph:

Learn how to write a great "CER" paragraph that includes a claim, evidence, and reasoning with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Developing a Central Idea: Spies and the Revolutionary War — Part Four:

Explore excerpts from the nonfiction book George Washington’s Secret Six: The Spies Who Saved America in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the final part of a four-part series. In this tutorial, you’ll read two more passages from the book about Washington’s spies. You’ll also determine the central ideas of the passages, identify key details, and practice writing a summary of a text. 

In order to practice the majority of the skills in the aligned standards, students must complete all four parts of the series. So, make sure to complete all four parts!

You should complete the previous tutorials in this series before beginning Part Four. 

Click HERE to launch Part One. 

Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Developing a Central Idea: Spies and the Revolutionary War — Part Three:

Explore excerpts from the nonfiction book George Washington’s Secret Six: The Spies Who Saved America in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is Part Three of a four-part series. In this tutorial, you'll read another passage from the book, identify the topic, and determine the central idea. Then, you'll review the central ideas from all the passages you've read throughout this series and examine how each central idea helps develop an overarching central idea of all the passages. 

In order to practice the majority of the skills in the aligned standards, students must complete all four parts of the series. Be sure to complete the first two parts before beginning Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part One. 

Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Make sure to do Part Four to complete the series! Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Developing a Central Idea: Spies and the Revolutionary War — Part Two:

Explore excerpts from the nonfiction book George Washington’s Secret Six: The Spies Who Saved America with this interactive tutorial. In this four-part series, you'll analyze several passages from the book and learn how to extract key information along the way. In Part Two, you'll read another passage from the book, identify the topic, determine the central idea, and examine how key details help develop the central idea.

In order to practice the majority of the skills in the aligned standards, students must complete all four parts of the series. Be sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part One. 

Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Developing a Central Idea: Spies and the Revolutionary War – Part One:

Explore excerpts from the nonfiction book George Washington’s Secret Six: The Spies Who Saved America with this interactive tutorial. In this four-part series, you'll analyze several passages from the book and learn how to extract key information along the way. By the end of Part One, you should be able to distinguish topics from central ideas and identify central ideas and key details in the text. 

In order to practice the majority of the skills in the aligned standards, students must complete all four parts of the series. So, make sure to complete all four parts!

Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Events Influence Individuals and Ideas – Part Three:

Examine how a significant event can influence individuals and ideas in this tutorial series about one of the most studied human injuries of all time. Read excerpts from John Fleischman’s book, Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science to learn about a young man’s remarkable survival after a near-fatal accident. 

This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. Make sure to complete the other parts first.

Click  to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Events Influence Individuals and Ideas – Part Two:

Examine how a significant event can influence individuals and ideas in this tutorial series about one of the most studied human injuries of all time. Read excerpts from John Fleischman’s book Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science to learn about a young man’s remarkable survival after a near-fatal accident. 

This tutorial is Part Two in a three-part series. Make sure to complete Part One first. Click  to launch Part One.

Then, make sure to complete Part Three! Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Events Influence Individuals and Ideas – Part One:

Examine how a significant event can influence individuals and ideas in this interactive tutorial series about one of the most studied human injuries of all time. Read excerpts from John Fleischman’s book Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science to learn about a young man’s remarkable survival after a near-fatal accident. Phineas Gage, at the age of twenty-six, survived a traumatic brain injury that would not only challenge the scientific understandings of his time but would also provide interesting revelations about the human brain to this day.

In Part One, you’ll begin to identify what makes a particular event significant, such as how a life-altering injury—like what happened to Phineas Gage—can influence an individual. 

This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. Make sure to complete all three parts!

Click  to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Events Shape Ideas in a Text -- Part Three:

Explore excerpts from astronaut Scott Kelly’s autobiography, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery, in this interactive tutorial. Using these excerpts, you’ll identify several important experiences in Scott Kelly’s young life that had a crucial impact on his later success. You’ll also determine how these events shaped important ideas or life lessons that Scott learned along the way. Finally, you’ll examine the connection between these important life events and the ideas or lessons Scott learned to determine how he discovered what it takes to achieve the nearly impossible.

This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. Make sure to complete Part One and Part Two before beginning Part Three. 

Click HERE to launch Part One. 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Events Shape Ideas in a Text -- Part Two:

Explore excerpts from astronaut Scott Kelly’s autobiography, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery, in this interactive tutorial. Using these excerpts, you’ll identify several important experiences in Scott Kelly’s young life that had a crucial impact on his later success. You’ll also determine how these events shaped important ideas that Scott learned along the way. 

This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. Make sure to complete all three parts!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Events Shape Ideas in a Text – Part One:

Explore excerpts from astronaut Scott Kelly’s autobiography, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery, in this interactive tutorial. Using these excerpts, you’ll identify several important experiences in Scott Kelly’s young life that had a crucial impact on his later success. You’ll also determine how these events shaped important ideas or life lessons that Scott learned along the way. Finally, you’ll examine the connection between these important life events and the ideas or lessons Scott learned to determine how he discovered what it takes to achieve the nearly impossible.

This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. Make sure to complete all three parts!

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Dream Compares to Reality -- Part Four:

Study excerpts from the essay “America and I” by Anzia Yezierska and learn about how she immigrated to America from Russia in the early 1900s. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze the comparisons she makes between her dream of life in America with the reality of her experience as an immigrant in America. 

This tutorial is Part Four of a four-part series. Make sure to complete the previous tutorials before beginning Part Four.

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Dream Compares to Reality -- Part Two:

Study excerpts from the essay “America and I” by Anzia Yezierska and learn about how she immigrated to America from Russia in the early 1900s. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze the comparison she makes between being in America but not being seen as American. Analyzing this comparison will help you better understand how her vision of life in America was different from the reality she experienced after arriving. 

This is the second tutorial of a 4-part series, so make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Then, make sure to complete the rest of the tutorial series.

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Dream Compares to Reality -- Part One:

Study excerpts from the essay “America and I” by Anzia Yezierska and learn about how she immigrated to America from Russia in the early 1900s. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze the comparison she makes between the reality of living in Russia and her vision of what life will be like in America. You'll also identify her use of vivid contrasts to better understand what motivated her to go to America. 

This tutorial is Part One. Make sure to complete the other tutorials in this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Don't Plagiarize: Cite Your Sources!:

Learn more about that dreaded word--plagiarism--in this interactive tutorial that's all about citing your sources, creating a Works Cited page, and avoiding academic dishonesty!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Avoiding Plagiarism and Citing Sources:

Learn more about that dreaded word--plagiarism--in this interactive tutorial that's all about citing your sources and avoiding academic dishonesty!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Stop the Zombie Virus by Interpreting Graphs:

Help scientists find the most effective vaccine for Zombie Virus vaccine by effectively analyzing and summarizing experimental data. In this interactive tutorial, you'll write a scientific question, a claim, supporting evidence and an explanation of what happened during the experiment.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Truth About Sugar?:

Analyze the central idea in multiple texts in this interactive tutorial. You'll read several short texts in which authors disagree about the effects of sugar consumption. You'll practice identifying their different central ideas and the various types of evidence used to support them.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Time for Revolution: Using Context Clues:

Use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in an informational text about the Revolutionary War in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

It's all about Mood: Creating a Found Poem:

Learn how to create a Found Poem with changing moods in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In Part One, students read “Zero Hour,” a science fiction short story by author Ray Bradbury and examined how he used various literary devices to create changing moods. In Part Two, students will use words and phrases from “Zero Hour” to create a Found Poem with two of the same moods from Bradbury's story.

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Addicted To Lotteries: An Analysis Of Text Structures:

Learn about four text structures often used in informational texts: sequence, compare and contrast, problem/solution, and cause and effect. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying these various text structures using a short article about playing the lottery. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Happy Halloween! Textual Evidence and Inferences:

Cite text evidence and make inferences about the "real" history of Halloween in this spooky interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Plagiarism: What Is It? How Can I Avoid It?:

Learn more about that dreaded word--plagiarism--in this interactive tutorial that's all about citing your sources and avoiding academic dishonesty!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Read Between the Lines: Understanding Analogies and Allusions:

Learn how authors use allusions and analogies within informational texts. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying analogies and allusions used in context to better understand their purpose. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Writing Style: Sharpen Your Skills:

Learn the difference between formal and informal writing in this interactive tutorial. You'll review the key differences between informative and argumentative writing. You'll also learn to tailor your writing based on your task, purpose, and audience.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Cyberwar! Citing Evidence and Making Inferences:

Learn how to cite evidence and draw inferences in this interactive tutorial. Using an informational text about cyber attacks, you'll practice identifying text evidence and making inferences based on the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Go For the Gold: Writing Claims & Using Evidence:

Learn how to define and identify claims being made within a text. This tutorial will also show you how evidence can be used effectively to support the claim being made. Lastly, this tutorial will help you write strong, convincing claims of your own.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Descriptive Sentences: How to Make Your Writing Roar:

Learn how to revise and strengthen your sentences in this interactive tutorial. You'll practice using adjectives and adverbs to make your sentences even stronger and more descriptive. You'll also practice distinguishing simple sentences from sentence fragments. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Game On: Finding the Central Idea:

Learn how to identify the central idea within a text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read an article about video games to practice identifying and explaining the central idea of a passage or text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Food For Thought: Analyzing Authors' Approaches:

Learn how different authors can approach the same topic in very different ways. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read several informational texts about how insects are a commonly eaten food in certain parts of the world. You'll practice identifying the central ideas of these texts as well as the authors' use of evidence. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Sacagawea: Evidence of Fearlessness:

Learn to identify evidence within a text to support inferences. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read all about Sacagawea—the Native American woman who helped Lewis and Clark on their expedition into the American wilderness. You'll practice identifying key pieces of evidence that support inferences that can be made from the text. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What's for Lunch?:

Learn how arguments are formed with claims, reasons, and evidence. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read several short speeches from students hoping to be elected president of the Student Council. We'll trace the claim made by each student and the reasons and evidence they use to support it.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Explain Yourself: Organizing Your Writing:

Learn several different strategies to help organize your writing in this interactive tutorial. You'll practice several different ways to introduce and organize ideas in your informative writing. These strategies include compare and contrast, classification, cause and effect, and definition

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Arguments: Making Claims & Using Evidence:

Learn to evaluate argumentative claims based on evidence with this interactive tutorial.  You'll also learn about statistics, facts, expert quotations, and anecdotes, and how each kind of evidence can strengthen an argument.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Weighing the Evidence: Supporting Claims in Arguments:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll study written arguments and claims. You'll examine four specific types of evidence that can be used to support a claim: facts, statistics, anecdotes, and expert quotations.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Structures and Skeletons:

Learn about four common text structures that often are often used in informational texts: chronological order, compare and contrast, problem/solution, and cause and effect. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying each type of text structure while reading several informational texts about dinosaurs. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Changing the Driving Age?:

Learn to analyze and evaluate arguments for their soundness and relevancy. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read several short passages about raising the legal drive age. You'll practice examining the evidence  presented to determine whether it's sound and relevant to the argument at hand.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Frederick Douglass: The Art of Interaction:

Examine the interactions between individuals, ideas, and events using excerpts from the book Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. In this interactive tutorial, you'll explore the relationships and events that helped shape Douglass's life and his courageous quest for freedom. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hot on the Trail:

Investigate how temperature affects the rate of chemical reactions in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Pavement Bookworm:

Learn how to use evidence from an informational, nonfiction text to support your analysis of what you have read. In this interactive tutorial you make inferences, or draw conclusions, from a passage about Philani Dladla, "The Pavement Bookworm."

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Turn the Key: Unlocking Authors' Intentions:

Learn how to identify an author's purpose and attitude toward a specific topic. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying the key differences between argumentative and informative writing. You'll also practice determining an author's attitude and beliefs toward a topic using several short informational texts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Connections and Concussions: Teens and Sports:

Practice making connections between key individuals discussed in an informational text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read a short text about the connection between high school football and concussions. You'll practice identifying specific details and making connections between individuals based on the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

All Aboard! The Central Idea Express:

Learn how to find the central idea of an informational text in this interactive tutorial! In this train-themed tutorial, you'll learn how to identify the central idea and identify its supporting details. You'll also practice summarizing the text to highlight its most important points.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Surviving Extreme Conditions:

In this tutorial, you will practice identifying relevant evidence within a text as you read excerpts from Jack London's short story, "To Build a Fire." Then, you'll practice your writing skills as you draft a short response using examples of relevant evidence from the story.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Introductions:

Learn how authors of informational texts "hook" readers and introduce information. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how authors engage readers by using interesting or unusual information, anecdotes, and quotes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Go Figure: Learning Figurative Language:

Learn to distinguish between figurative and literal language in context. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine excerpts of speeches from John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Barack Obama. You'll practice identifying the following types of figurative language: similes, metaphors, personification, and onomatopoeia. You'll also practice determining the intended meaning of these examples of figurative language. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

State Your Claim:

Learn how to state your claim effectively in this interactive tutorial. This argumentative writing lesson will also teach you how to capture readers' attention using "grabbers" before stating your claim.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Arguing Mars :

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to identify a speaker’s argument or claim. You will also learn how to evaluate the evidence and reasoning presented in a speech.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Jeans for Learning: Argumentative Writing:

Learn how to identify and write strong argumentative claims. In this interactive tutorial, you'll first learn how to create a strong claim, and then you'll practice writing the introduction to your own argumentative essay.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parts of a Whole:

Learn about the common text structures used in informational texts. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying these four frequently used text structures: problem/solution, cause and effect, sequence, and compare and contrast. You'll also learn to recognize the signal words that often accompany each type of text structure. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Robots Come to Life:

Learn to identify the central idea of an informational text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read an article about cutting-edge robots. Using this text, you'll practice identifying important details in the article to help determine the central idea.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Dream Compares to Reality -- Part Three:

Study excerpts from the essay “America and I” by Anzia Yezierska and analyze the comparison she makes between her actual work experience in America and her dream of finding work that would bring out the best in her. Analyzing this comparison in this interactive tutorial will help you understand how Anzia's vision of life in America was different from the reality she experienced after immigrating to America. 

This is the third tutorial in a 4-part series. Make sure to complete Parts One and Two first. Then, complete the rest of this tutorial series.

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Language Wizard: Active & Passive Voice:

Learn to define and explain active and passive voice in this wizard-themed interactive tutorial. You will also learn how to transform passive voice to active voice to make your writing stronger.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Text Resource

Understanding Invasive Aquatic Plants:

This web resource provides students with an explanation of the differences between native, nonnative, and invasive plants, along with information on three of Florida's aquatic invasive plants--the water hyacinth, hydrilla, and alligatorweed. Through text questions and activities, students will learn how these plants can impair aquatic and wetland ecosystems and inhibit human uses of Florida waters. Readers will gain a greater understanding of how important it is to monitor and control invasive aquatic plants.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

Hints about Print: Evaluating Print Resources :

Use this interactive tutorial to explore how to select print resources for a research assignment. The tutorial demonstrates tips on how to evaluate the author, select images, and use text features to gather information prior to writing. To get started, click on the Go to Demo arrow to learn more about these tips, then select the Try It arrow to download a worksheet that will allow you to use these tips on your own project.

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 4: Using Commas Correctly:

This fun and interactive exercise will give you practice using commas correctly in sentences. For each practice item, you must use commas in a sentence only where appropriate. After every response, you will get immediate feedback.

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 3: Using Commas Correctly:

This fun and interactive exercise will give you practice using commas correctly in sentences. For each practice item, you must use commas in a sentence only where appropriate. After every response, you will get immediate feedback.

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 2: Fixing Comma Errors in Sentences:

This fun and interactive exercise will give you practice fixing comma errors in sentences. For each practice item, you must select the best choice to revise a sentence so that it uses commas correctly. After every response, you will get immediate feedback. 

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 1: Fixing Comma Errors in Sentences:

This fun and interactive exercise will give you practice fixing comma errors in sentences. For each practice item, you must correct the comma error in a sentence. After every response, you will get immediate feedback. The site also provides an explanation of the rules of proper sentence structure for you to study, simply click the hyperlinked "Comma Tip” that appears with feedback.

Type: Tutorial

Which Writing is Right? :

Use this interactive tutorial to improve your expository writing skills. This tutorial asks you questions about the qualities of expository writing and provides feedback on your responses. Finally, you will write a short paragraph and judge your own writing using the tutorial's criteria for effective expository writing.

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 4: Simplifying Sentences with Apostrophes :

This interactive exercise will give you practice simplifying sentences with apostrophes. For each practice item, you must simplify a sentence by typing a revision that demonstrates the correct use of an apostrophe. After every response, you will get immediate feedback. If you don’t know which word or words to type, the “I Give Up” button will help you out.

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 5: Simplifying Sentences with Apostrophes:

This interactive exercise will give you practice simplifying sentences with apostrophes. For each practice item, you must simplify a sentence by typing a revision that demonstrates the correct use of an apostrophe. After every response, you will get immediate feedback. If you don’t know which word or words to type, the “I Give Up” button will help you out.

Type: Tutorial

Using Supporting Examples:

In this tutorial you will practice using supporting details. Each practice gives you a main idea and three possible details. Your job is to choose the detail that best supports the main idea. Each question gives you feedback on why your answer is correct or incorrect.

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 7: Correcting Sentence Fragments :

This interactive exercise will give you practice in correcting sentence fragments. For each practice item, you must select the best choice to correct a fragment in a short passage. After every response, you will get immediate feedback. Explanations of each correct answer are also provided. There's also an explanation of the rules of proper sentence structure for you to study; simply click the hyperlinked word "rules."

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 6: Correcting Sentence Fragments :

This fun and interactive exercise will give you practice in correcting sentence fragments. For each practice item, you must select the best choice to correct a fragment in a short passage. After every response, you will get immediate feedback. Explanations of each correct answer are also provided. There's also an explanation of the rules of proper sentence structure for you to study, simply click the hyperlinked word "rules."

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 5: Correcting Sentence Fragments :

This fun and interactive exercise will give you practice in correcting sentence fragments. For each practice item, you must select the best choice to correct a fragment in a short passage. After every response, you will get immediate feedback. Explanations of each correct answer are also provided. There's also an explanation of the rules of proper sentence structure for you to study, simply click the hyperlinked word "rules."

Type: Tutorial

Primary Additive Colors:

This resource helps the user learn the three primary colors that are fundamental to human vision, learn the different colors in the visible spectrum, observe the resulting colors when two colors are added, and learn what white light is. A combination of text and a virtual manipulative allows the user to explore these concepts in multiple ways.

Type: Tutorial

Primary Subtractive Colors:

The user will learn the three primary subtractive colors in the visible spectrum, explore the resulting colors when two subtractive colors interact with each other and explore the formation of black color.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.
Grades 6-8

Reading Informational Text
Benchmark Notes: These reading informational text benchmarks offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each succeeding year's grade specific benchmarks, retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades, and work steadily toward meeting the more general expectations described by the CCR anchor standards.

Writing
Benchmark Notes: Each year in their writing, students should demonstrate increasing sophistication in all aspects of language use, from vocabulary and syntax to the development and organization of ideas, and they should address increasingly demanding content and sources. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each succeeding year's grade-specific writing benchmarks and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.

Speaking and Listening
Benchmark Notes:
The following speaking and listening benchmarks offer a focus for instruction each year to help ensure students gain adequate mastery of a range of skills and applications. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year's grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.

The Florida Standards Mathematical Practices should be incorporated as appropriate.

With reference to W.2.4 standard W.1.3 reads as follows:
LAFS.6.W.1.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
b. Use narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details and sensory language to convey experiences and events.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

LAFS.7.W.1.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
b. Use narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

LAFS.8.W.1.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
b. Use narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, description,and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and show the relationships among experiences and events.
d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.