M/J United States History & Digital Technologies   (#2100035)

Version for Academic Year:
The course was/will be terminated at the end of School Year 2017 - 2018

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

Primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of American history from the Exploration and Colonization period to the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to explore those fundamental ideas and events which occurred after Reconstruction.

Mathematics Benchmark Guidance - Social Studies instruction should include opportunities for students to interpret and create representations of historical events and concepts using mathematical tables, charts, and graphs.

Digital Technologies - The digital curriculum required by Section 1003.4203 (3), Florida Statutes, has been integrated into this course. Listed below are the competencies that must be met to satisfy the requirements of (Section 1003.4203 (3), Florida Statutes):

Web Technologies
01.0 Demonstrate proficiency planning an effective website.
01.01 Create a site map and associated wireframes for a website.
01.02 Develop an effective site map for a website.
01.03 Create page layout wireframes for a website.

02.0 Demonstrate an understanding of webpage construction, operation, and function.
02.01 Categorize websites according to their purpose and domain.
02.02 Identify elements of a webpage.
02.03 Define basic HTML terminology.
02.04 Critique the aesthetic and functional operation of sample websites.

03.0 Apply the principles of design in the preparation of a webpage.
03.01 Apply best practices in visual design (e.g., color schemes, fonts, navigation methods, pagination).
03.02 Explain the key concepts of meeting client needs.
03.03 Apply the principles of Human Computer Interface (HCI) to design and develop an effective look and feel for a website.
03.04 Design and create a webpage for optimal display in multiple browsers.
03.05 Create an appropriate directory structure, naming convention protocol, and file organization for a website.

04.0 Demonstrate proficiency in using a GUI editor, web design, or web animation software for web page design.
04.01 Create and apply style sheets for consistent website design.
04.02 Create and edit images and photographs for Web pages using digital imaging software (e.g., ImageReady in Photoshop).
04.03 Demonstrate knowledge of image formats related to photos and graphics on the Internet (e.g. Graphic: TIFF, BMP, EPS, Web: JPEG, GIF, PNG, et al).
04.04 Save and export a photograph to the Web in the format best for image quality and file size.
04.05 Build, optimize, edit, and test web pages for publication.
04.06 Demonstrate an understanding of network and web implementation issues (e.g., bandwidth, compression, streaming).
04.07 Compare and contrast various methods by which information may be accessed on the Internet/Intranet (e.g., FTP, telnet, browser).
04.08 Demonstrate an understanding of file encryption methods (e.g., secure server, unsecured server).

05.0 Demonstrate proficiency using web development tools and techniques to enhance a website's interactivity, appeal, or performance.
05.01 Compare and contrast writing HTML using a text editor versus using a Graphical User Interface (GUI) editor.
05.02 Design and create an effective web page template.
05.03 Create attractive, engaging, and efficient web pages using a GUI editor.
05.04 Insert audio files into a Web page.
05.05 Create, edit and integrate video files into a Web page.
05.06 Create, edit and integrate animation files into a Web page.
05.07 Use Dynamic HTML (DHTML) to enhance webpage interactivity.
05.08 Create webpages using basic HTML tags (e.g., links, lists, character styles, text alignment, tables).

06.0 Prepare a website for launch.
06.01 Evaluate a website for basic usability and accessibility issues.
06.02 List the steps that are necessary to determine when a website is ready to launch.
06.03 Develop a User Testing Plan that includes validating the operation of all navigation, display, and media functions and features.
06.04 Demonstrate the ability to organize and execute a user testing of a website.
06.05 Use File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to publish all website files to the Internet.
06.06 Monitor website performance metrics (e.g., visitor count, downloads, et al) using host-based information tools.

Special Notes:

Additional content that may be contained in the NAEP Grade 8 United States History assessment includes material from all time periods on the following topics:
  • Change and Continuity in American Democracy: Ideas, Institutions, Events, Key Figures, and Controversies
  • The Gathering and Interactions of Peoples, Cultures, and Ideas
  • Economic and Technological Changes and Their Relationship to Society, Ideas, and the Environment
  • The Changing Role of America in the World
The NAEP frameworks for United States History may be accessed at http://www.nagb.org/content/nagb/assets/documents/publications/frameworks/historyframework.pdf

Instructional Practices

Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning:

1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.

2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.

3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.

4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.

5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

General Information

Course Number: 2100035
Abbreviated Title: M/J USHIST & DIGTECH
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 6,7,8

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

The Great Debate: Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll compare the viewpoints of the two groups on opposite sides of the great debate over ratifying the U.S. Constitution: Federalists and Anti-Federalists.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Changing the Driving Age?:

Learn to analyze and evaluate arguments for their soundness and relevancy. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read several short passages about raising the legal drive age. You'll practice examining the evidence  presented to determine whether it's sound and relevant to the argument at hand.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Where Have All the Scrub-Jays Gone?:

Investigate the limiting factors of a Florida ecosystem and describe how these limiting factors affect one native population-the Florida Scrub-Jay-with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Yes or No to GMO?:

Learn what genetic engineering is and some of the applications of this technology. In this interactive tutorial, you’ll gain an understanding of some of the benefits and potential drawbacks of genetic engineering. Ultimately, you’ll be able to think critically about genetic engineering and write an argument describing your own perspective on its impacts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Britain vs. America: What Led to the Declaration of Independence:

In this interactive tutorial, learn why Great Britain and her 13 American colonies split between 1763 and 1776.  At the end of this time span, Britain and America were at war, and the Declaration of Independence had announced the United States of America as a brand new nation, no longer colonies of Britain.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Declaration of Independence :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to analyze the ideas, grievances (complaints), and language found in the Declaration of Independence, one of the most important documents in the history of the United States.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding the Preamble :

Analyze the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution -- line by line, word by word -- in this interactive tutorial!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Confederation to Constitution:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the Articles of Confederation, our nation’s first written constitution.  You'll identify its major weaknesses and their consequences, and you'll explain the reasons why America's Founders replaced the Articles of Confederation with the government we still use today, the U.S. Constitution.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

Abraham Lincoln's Crossroads:

In this tutorial, you will play an interactive and educational game that invites you to learn about Abraham Lincoln's leadership and decisions during the Civil War era. As you explore and learn about the political choices he made, you'll get a chance to make the same decisions as Lincoln did and compare your choices to his. Can you think like Lincoln? Good luck!

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

Yorktown: Now or Never:

View a 10-part video on the Battle of Yorktown, the culminating battle of the Revolutionary War. With French aid, George Washington led American troops to a victory that ensured American independence.

In addition to the video, you will find primary source documents and a graphic organizer to help you analyze the Battle of Yorktown in greater detail.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

A More Perfect Union: George Washington and the Making of the Constitution:

This 3-part video from Mount Vernon details the struggles that led delegates from the 13 colonies to hold a Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. At this convention, under the leadership of George Washington, the delegates rejected the Articles of Confederation in favor of a new, stronger federal government. After the Constitution's ratification, Washington become the new nation's first president.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.
Aligned clusters:

MAFS.6.SP.1 Summarize and describe distributions.