What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part One

Resource ID#: 175179 Type: Original Student Tutorial
error indicator Login will be required December 31, 2021 to access all the CPALMS original student tutorials. Florida public school students will continue to have access to this and all other tutorials at www.floridastudents.org or their CPALMS Class Sites. Florida public school teachers will continue to be able to access them here and on www.floridastudents.org For all other teachers, parents, and students, you can access them with a subscription on www.cpalms.com

Attachments

Accessible Version Accessible version of the tutorial content in pdfformat

General Information

Subject(s): Social Studies
Grade Level(s): 11, 12
Intended Audience: Students
Instructional Time: 35 Minute(s)
Resource supports reading in content area:Yes
Keywords: English Language Arts, Harold L. Ickes, speech, point of view, claims, argument, purpose, World War II, WWII, "What Is an American?", ELA, POV, tutorials, interactive, historical speeches, e learning, e-learning, English, Language Arts, historical American speeches, speeches
Instructional Component Type(s): Original Student Tutorial

Aligned Standards

This vetted resource aligns to concepts or skills in these benchmarks.

Suggested Tutorials


What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Three:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read more excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will evaluate the effectiveness of his argument's structure. 

Be sure to complete the first two parts before completing Part Three.

Click HERE for Part One. Click HERE for Part Two. 

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Two:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will identify his use of rhetorical appeals and analyze the structure of his argument. 

Make sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE for Part One.

Click HERE for Part Three.

The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including women and minorities, during WWII.

Understanding the Holocaust: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about one of the darkest chapters in human history, the Holocaust.  You'll learn how Adolf Hitler rose to power in Nazi Germany and made the murder of 6 million Jews and 5 million others the official policy of the Third Reich during World War II.  You'll learn how the Holocaust ended and contemplate its impact on humanity.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.  

Understanding the Holocaust: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about one of the darkest chapters in human history, the Holocaust.  You'll learn how Adolf Hitler rose to power in Nazi Germany and made the murder of 6 million Jews and 5 million others the official policy of the Third Reich during World War II.  You'll learn how the Holocaust ended and contemplate its impact on humanity.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Winning World War II: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn how the United States and the Allies defeated the Axis Powers to win World War II. You'll learn about battles and military campaigns, including D-Day, in both the European and Pacific theaters of war. And you'll learn how atomic weapons brought the war to an end but changed the postwar world forever.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

World War II Begins: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn how World War II began in Europe and Asia. You'll learn about the aggression of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan that threatened world peace, and you'll learn how the United States responded with isolationism...until the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 caused America to join the Allies.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Winning World War II: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn how the United States and the Allies defeated the Axis Powers to win World War II.  You'll learn about battles and military campaigns, including D-Day, in both the European and Pacific theaters of war.  And you'll learn how atomic weapons brought the war to an end but changed the postwar world forever.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

 

World War II Begins: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn how World War II began in Europe and Asia. You'll learn about the aggression of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan that threatened world peace, and you'll learn how the United States responded with isolationism...until the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 caused America to join the Allies.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

From World War to Cold War: Part 2:

Explore the beginnings of the Cold War from 1945 to 1953. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn why this rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union was a unique conflict in our nation's history and how the U.S. assumed the role of world leader after World War II.  Finally, you'll learn how the Korean War was a proxy war in the larger context of the Cold War.  

This is part 2 in a two-part series. CLICK HERE to open Part 1. 

From World War to Cold War: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, explore the beginnings of the Cold War from 1945 to 1953.  You'll learn why this rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union was a unique conflict in our nation's history, and how the U.S. assumed the role of world leader after World War II.  Finally, you'll learn how the Korean War was a proxy war in the larger context of the Cold War.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Related Resources

Other vetted resources related to this resource.