SC.2.E.7.1

Compare and describe changing patterns in nature that repeat themselves, such as weather conditions including temperature and precipitation, day to day and season to season.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 2
Body of Knowledge: Earth and Space Science
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Big Idea: Earth Systems and Patterns - Humans continue to explore the interactions among water, air, and land. Air and water are in constant motion that results in changing conditions that can be observed over time.
Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5020030: Science - Grade Two (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7720030: Access Science Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
5020090: STEM Lab Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.2.E.7.In.1: Identify common weather patterns associated with each season.
SC.2.E.7.Su.1: Recognize types of weather and match to the weather outdoors.
SC.2.E.7.Pa.1: Recognize daily outdoor temperature as hot or cold.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Celebrity Parties Inc. MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) requires students to develop a procedure to determine which month to hold an outdoor party for a celebrity pop star. Students will need to apply their knowledge of weather patterns and severe weather effects to determine which month would most likely have the best weather for the event.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

It's Raining Research pt. 3:

This is a continuation of It's Raining Research (Lesson # 36797) and It's Raining Research Part 2 (Lesson #38864). This lesson demonstrates how students can use nonfiction text features to locate information relating to the different types of precipitation. The students will use nonfiction text features to gather information to describe when rain, snow, hail, and sleet occur. Students will share the information they have learned by creating a poster.

Type: Lesson Plan

It's Raining Research (pt. 2):

This is a continuation of "It's Raining Research." Part 2 of this lesson demonstrates how students can use nonfiction text features to locate information relating to the different types of precipitation. The students will use nonfiction text features to gather information to describe the events that cause rain, snow, hail, and sleet to occur and then tell how they are similar and different.

Type: Lesson Plan

Big Beach Travels:

Big Beach Travels has selected the students to help them choose the best month for their client to visit Daytona Beach. Students will use rainfall and temperature information to inform their decisions and to rank the other months from best time to visit to worst time to visit. In a twist, they will be told that the clients changed their minds and, instead, would like to travel to Ft. Lauderdale and see a concert on the beach while they are there. Students must use the same data for Ft. Lauderdale as well as event information to determine the best month to visit and rank the other months in order from best time to visit to worst.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Family Vacation:

In this 2nd grade MEA, students will analyze weather conditions in a team to determine which time of the year and which city would be the best to visit based on weather patterns from season to season and day to day in Florida.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Stormy Studies:

This lesson teaches children about different weather patterns using nonfiction text with supporting pictures. After reading the text, children will play a Jeopardy style game and then create a foldable as a formative assessment.

Type: Lesson Plan

It's Raining Research:

This lesson demonstrates how students can use nonfiction text features to locate information relating to the different types of precipitation. The students will use nonfiction text features to gather information to describe rain, snow, hail, and sleet. Students will use this information to describe the similarities and differences in the various types of precipitation.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's The Weather?:

This is an introductory lesson to teaching the students how to ask questions about the key details of a story.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the Weather?:

In this lesson, students use daily observations, videos, and activities to learn about meteorology and the changing nature of weather. Students also identify weather events that are commonly reported in the news and discuss how weather affects lives.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Patterns in Precipitation:

Compare seasonal precipitation patterns in Miami and Tallahassee, Florida by interpreting data on bar graphs in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 2 of a 2-part series, click HERE to view part 1, Patterns in Temperature.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Patterns in Temperature:

Compare daily and seasonal temperature patterns in Miami and Tallahassee, Florida in this interactive science tutorial.

This is part 1 of 2-part series, click HERE to view part 2, Patterns in Precipitation. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Presentation/Slideshow

Seasons:

This is an accessible, easy-to-read book about the four seasons in the Western hemisphere. It can be downloaded in Power Point, Impress, and Flash formats. For struggling or non-readers, the book can be speech enabled in a variety of voices. All of the books on the Tar Heel Reader site can be used with the Intellikeys keyboard and a custom overlay, a touch screen, and/or 1-3 switches. The text and background colors can be modified for readers with visual impairments.

Type: Presentation/Slideshow

Resource Collection

Air and Weather - FOSS Module:

The Air and Weather Module consists of four sequential investigations, each designed to introduce concepts in earth science. The investigations provide opportunities for young students to explore the natural world by using simple tools to observe and monitor change.

Type: Resource Collection

Teaching Idea

Shadows:

Students will explore and measure shadows and their relationships to time of day. Students will measure the lengths of a meter stick's shadow at different times of the day (or seasons) to determine when a shadow casts its longest and shortest shadows.

Type: Teaching Idea

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Weather Measure:

In this unit, students learn about meteorology and act as meteorologists, predict and take temperature measurements, and create a severe weather preparedness plan.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Video/Audio/Animation

Observe Water in Winter and Summer:

This video clip explores what happens to water in the same location over the course of different seasons. On Earth, water can be found regularly in its three distinct phases; liquid, solid, and gas. Each phase has noticeably different properties that need to be considered in certain circumstances. The phase of water is influenced by atmospheric conditions, specifically seasonal temperatures. An example, is that a boat can float and glide on water in the summer, but it cannot pass through solid ice in the winter.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Big Beach Travels:

Big Beach Travels has selected the students to help them choose the best month for their client to visit Daytona Beach. Students will use rainfall and temperature information to inform their decisions and to rank the other months from best time to visit to worst time to visit. In a twist, they will be told that the clients changed their minds and, instead, would like to travel to Ft. Lauderdale and see a concert on the beach while they are there. Students must use the same data for Ft. Lauderdale as well as event information to determine the best month to visit and rank the other months in order from best time to visit to worst.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Celebrity Parties Inc. MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) requires students to develop a procedure to determine which month to hold an outdoor party for a celebrity pop star. Students will need to apply their knowledge of weather patterns and severe weather effects to determine which month would most likely have the best weather for the event.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Family Vacation:

In this 2nd grade MEA, students will analyze weather conditions in a team to determine which time of the year and which city would be the best to visit based on weather patterns from season to season and day to day in Florida.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Original Student Tutorials Science - Grades K-8

Patterns in Precipitation:

Compare seasonal precipitation patterns in Miami and Tallahassee, Florida by interpreting data on bar graphs in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 2 of a 2-part series, click HERE to view part 1, Patterns in Temperature.

Patterns in Temperature:

Compare daily and seasonal temperature patterns in Miami and Tallahassee, Florida in this interactive science tutorial.

This is part 1 of 2-part series, click HERE to view part 2, Patterns in Precipitation. 

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Patterns in Precipitation:

Compare seasonal precipitation patterns in Miami and Tallahassee, Florida by interpreting data on bar graphs in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 2 of a 2-part series, click HERE to view part 1, Patterns in Temperature.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Patterns in Temperature:

Compare daily and seasonal temperature patterns in Miami and Tallahassee, Florida in this interactive science tutorial.

This is part 1 of 2-part series, click HERE to view part 2, Patterns in Precipitation. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Presentation/Slideshow

Seasons:

This is an accessible, easy-to-read book about the four seasons in the Western hemisphere. It can be downloaded in Power Point, Impress, and Flash formats. For struggling or non-readers, the book can be speech enabled in a variety of voices. All of the books on the Tar Heel Reader site can be used with the Intellikeys keyboard and a custom overlay, a touch screen, and/or 1-3 switches. The text and background colors can be modified for readers with visual impairments.

Type: Presentation/Slideshow

Video/Audio/Animation

Observe Water in Winter and Summer:

This video clip explores what happens to water in the same location over the course of different seasons. On Earth, water can be found regularly in its three distinct phases; liquid, solid, and gas. Each phase has noticeably different properties that need to be considered in certain circumstances. The phase of water is influenced by atmospheric conditions, specifically seasonal temperatures. An example, is that a boat can float and glide on water in the summer, but it cannot pass through solid ice in the winter.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Presentation/Slideshow

Seasons:

This is an accessible, easy-to-read book about the four seasons in the Western hemisphere. It can be downloaded in Power Point, Impress, and Flash formats. For struggling or non-readers, the book can be speech enabled in a variety of voices. All of the books on the Tar Heel Reader site can be used with the Intellikeys keyboard and a custom overlay, a touch screen, and/or 1-3 switches. The text and background colors can be modified for readers with visual impairments.

Type: Presentation/Slideshow

Resource Collection

Air and Weather - FOSS Module:

The Air and Weather Module consists of four sequential investigations, each designed to introduce concepts in earth science. The investigations provide opportunities for young students to explore the natural world by using simple tools to observe and monitor change.

Type: Resource Collection