Cluster 3: Integration of Knowledge and IdeasArchived


General Information
Number: LAFS.910.RH.3
Title: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Type: Cluster
Subject: English Language Arts - Archived
Grade: 910
Strand: Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6–12

Related Standards

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Lesson Plans

Florida During the Spanish-American War of 1898: Structured Academic Debate on African-American Participation in the War:

In this activity, students examine examples of newspaper editorials arguing both sides of this debate along with documents describing Floridian attitudes toward black soldiers. Using this evidence, students will explore ideas about the meaning of black participation in the Spanish-American War

Type: Lesson Plan

Show Me the Money:

This lesson is an application activity in which students will use relative frequencies to support an argument. Students will be given the task of creating an argument that would support why their club/team should be awarded a monetary prize that the school has won. The students will create statistical questions, collect their own data, analyze and interpret it to support their claim, present their argument, critique other arguments, and refine their argument for a rebuttal and closing remarks. The project will be graded with the rubric found in the Summative Assessment section, and has a student packet attached as well. All attachments can be modified.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cultural Identity and Values: What is Culture?:

This lesson gives students an opportunity to examine the complex concept of culture and to understand that while all people have a culture, for some it may mean the country or region of their ancestors, and for others it may encompass areas including family, religion and community. Students learn that no matter how it is defined, culture gives people a sense of who they are. Before students examine their own cultural backgrounds and United States culture, they will develop a working definition of culture.

Type: Lesson Plan

Japanese American Internment: Evaluating Primary Sources:

This web resource from the Library of Congress supports student use of primary sources to understand the Japanese American experience of internment during World War II. The resource includes graphic organizers for students to use online or through printed copies, and primary source photos and interviews along with procedures for teaching the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Perfect Steak Oven:

The lesson integrates language arts and physical science standards through the use of a Model Eliciting Activity. Students collaborate to create a procedure to solve a particular problem (the best steak oven).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fish Tank pH:

The lesson incorporates language arts and physical science content through the use of supplemental readings and Model Eliciting Activity. In this lesson student will use their knowledge of the pH scale, hydronium ion concentrations and critical thinking to find the solution to a problem.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rodent Infestation:

The lesson integrates language arts and science through the use of a Model Eliciting Activity. The lesson requires student collaboration to develop a solution to a problem. Chemistry is integrated because they must utilize their knowledge of the periodic table.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

After Reconstruction: Problems of African Americans in the South:

In this lesson, students use the collection's Timeline of African American History, 1852-1925 to identify problems and issues facing African Americans immediately after Reconstruction. Working in small groups on assigned issues, students search the collection for documents that describe the problem and consider opposing points of view, and suggest a remedy for the problem. Students then present the results of their research in a simulated African American Congress, modeled on a congress documented in the collection's special presentation, Progress of a People.

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Brand of Chocolate Chip Cookie Would You Buy?:

In this activity, students will utilize measurement data provided in a chart to calculate areas, volumes, and densities of cookies. They will then analyze their data and determine how these values can be used to market a fictitious brand of chocolate chip cookie. Finally, they will integrate cost and taste into their analyses and generate a marketing campaign for a cookie brand of their choosing based upon a set sample data which has been provided to them.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Investigating Earthquakes with Google Earth:

Students will explore the relationship between earthquakes and the tectonic plate boundaries using Google Earth. Students will track earthquakes noting location, magnitude and date. Students will apply their findings to formulate an understanding the processes that shape the earth.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents:

In this tutorial, you'll practice identifying and analyzing how specific concepts are addressed in texts from two different time periods. The featured texts include the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. You'll practice analyzing the similarities and differences in how the two texts address certain concepts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Nationalism, Colonialism, and The Cold War:

This web resource provides a full teaching unit in PDF format designed to help students understand shifts in world politics during the second half of the twentieth century. Through an examination of primary and secondary source documents, students will work to gain awareness of the process that led to the creation of more than fifty independent sovereign states. Students will analyze the influence that the Soviet Union and the United States held over new states during the Cold War. The unit's summative assessment asks students to present research findings explaining the specific contexts of one newly-independent African state and one newly-independent Southeast Asian state.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents:

In this tutorial, you'll practice identifying and analyzing how specific concepts are addressed in texts from two different time periods. The featured texts include the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. You'll practice analyzing the similarities and differences in how the two texts address certain concepts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.