Executive Internship 2   (#0500310)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

The purpose of this course is to supplement the existing curriculum by providing community internships. Students apply textbook learning, leadership skills, and understanding in challenging and creative professional areas.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
  • study of a variety of career options
  • written and oral communication skills
  • higher-level thinking skills
  • interpersonal relationship skills
  • factors affecting job performance
  • in-depth research study
  • theories of executive management
  • the influence of unions
  • economic factors affecting free enterprise
  • knowledge of professional organizations and their impact
  • career planning

General Information

Course Number: 0500310
Abbreviated Title: EXEC INTERN 2
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Word Sleuth: Using Context Clues:

Learn to use context clues, including synonyms, antonyms, and inferences, to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Letter to My Daughter: How Ideas Are Developed:

Read excerpts from Maya Angelou's book of essays, Letter to My Daughter. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you'll identify an important idea in each excerpt and examine how the author develops the important idea throughout the section of text. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part Two:

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this interactive tutorial series. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations.

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Our Mothers’ Gardens: An Account in Two Mediums:

Learn about author Alice Walker and the influence and legacy of her mother, Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you’ll read excerpts from “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,” an essay written by Alice Walker. You’ll also watch a video titled “A Black Writer in the South,” which highlights important aspects of Alice Walker’s childhood. You'll also analyze various accounts of a subject, in this case, the influence and legacy of Alice Walker’s mother, as told through two different mediums: text and video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self":

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech on women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal her point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help express an author's point of view.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Two: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Two, you will read more of Kennedy's speech, identify the smaller claims in this part of his speech, and examine his reasons and evidence.

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part One: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part One, you will read the beginning of Kennedy's speech, examine his reasons and evidence in this section, and identify the main claim of his argument. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Claims, Reasons, and Evidence: Examining Fair Arguments:

Learn about claims, reasons, and evidence using excerpts from a speech by author J.K. Rowling. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to identify an author’s claims and examine the fairness of an argument based on the soundness of its foundation, which should be built layer by layer with solid claims, reasons, and evidence.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Metaphors and Imagery in E.B. White's "Once More to the Lake":

Explore the effect of metaphors and imagery within a text in this interactive tutorial. First, you’ll practice identifying the use of these literary devices within a text, and then you’ll examine how they contribute to the meaning and beauty of the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Connotative Meaning in Annie Dillard's "Total Eclipse":

Learn to differentiate the connotative and denotative meanings of words in context. In this interactive tutorial, you'll  study excerpts from “Total Eclipse,” an essay written by Annie Dillard. You will analyze Dillard’s word choices throughout portions of her essay to better understand their impact and meanings. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part Two):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part interactive tutorial. In Part 2, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to complete all three parts!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part Three):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part interactive tutorial. In Part 3, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to open the first two parts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part One):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part interactive tutorial. In Part 1, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to complete all three parts!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 2 of 4):

Learn how to identify the central idea and important details of a text, as well as how to write an effective summary in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second tutorial in a four-part series that examines how scientists are using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. 

This tutorial is part two of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Avoiding Plagiarism: It's Not Magic:

Learn how to avoid plagiarism in this interactive tutorial. You will also learn how to follow a standard format for citation and how to format your research paper using MLA style. Along the way, you will also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series on research writing.

Be sure to complete Part One first. Click to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Careful Choices: Integrating Information and Selecting for Style:

Learn how to integrate information from a text into your own writing to maintain the flow of ideas, avoid plagiarism, and cite your sources. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read an excerpt from novel The Poisonwood Bible. Using this text, you will practice selecting relevant information and integrating it into your own written responses.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring and Gathering Vocabulary:

Learn several ways to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words, including context clues, word parts, and dictionary skills. In this interactive tutorial, you'll apply these strategies to text passages from John Muir's book A Thousand-mile Walk to the Gulf, which includes vivid descriptions of Florida in the late 1800s.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Words and Phrases with the Gettysburg Address:

Read and examine Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address in this interactive tutorial. First, you'll practice using context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in the famous text. Next, you'll analyze Lincoln's specific word choice throughout the speech and examine how it conveys his tone or attitude.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Eliminating Exotics: Identifying and Assessing Research for Quality and Usefulness:

Learn how to better conduct research in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn to distinguish relevant from irrelevant sources when conducting research on a specific topic. In addition, you'll practice identifying authoritative sources and selecting the appropriate keywords to find quality sources for your topic.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Powerful Rhetoric: Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how speakers use rhetoric to achieve their purpose. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how speakers can achieve their purpose through the use of pathos, ethos, and logos. Using excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress," you'll analyze how speakers use rhetoric to make their case effectively.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evolution: Examining the Evidence:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text.

You should be able to explain how different types of scientific evidence support the theory of evolution, including direct observation, fossils, DNA, biogeography, and comparative anatomy and embryology.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Changing with the Times: Variation within Ecosystems:

 Explore how environmental changes at different time scales affect living organisms within ecosystems in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing an Author’s Claims :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice determining an author's claim and how it's supported by specific details. You'll read several nonfiction texts, including excerpts by Sojourner Truth and Harriet Beecher Stowe. You'll analyze how each author effectively expresses her claim.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Get More of the Scoop: Analyzing Text and Video Accounts of a Subject:

Learn how to analyze accounts of the same subject expressed in different mediums. In this interactive tutorial, you'll compare and contrast the details included in a short text with those included in a short video. We'll use President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address to examine how certain details are presented and emphasized differently in each medium. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Analyzing the Use of Rhetoric:

Learn how to identify and analyze a speaker's use of rhetoric and rhetorical techniques. In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine the art of rhetoric as well as Aristotle's Rhetorical Triangle. We'll analyze the use of ethos, pathos, and logos in several historical speeches. We'll also analyze how speakers convey their point of view about a topic through the use of various rhetorical techniques, including repetition and rhetorical questions.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Remembering Selma: Analyzing the Use of Rhetorical Devices:

Learn to analyze the use of rhetorical devices in a nonfiction text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine excerpts from President Obama's speech on the 50th Anniversary of the March on Selma and analyze his use of three specific rhetorical devices: antithesis, rhetorical questions, and anaphora. You'll also analyze how he uses these rhetorical devices to help achieve his specific purpose. Along the way, you'll brush up on some important American history. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorials

OWL Purdue: MLA Works Cited:

Learn how to create a Works Cited page with this step-by-step guide. A short video walks you through all of the formatting and style choices you need to make for your next source-based paper. It specifically explains what information must be included for the following sources: books, articles, maps, newspapers, websites, and more.

Type: Tutorial

MLA Format and Documentation:

In this tutorial you will learn how to use MLA format and documentation in your academic papers. You will be able to work at your own pace. Also, throughout the tutorial you will receive plenty of examples to model in your paper.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.
LAFS.910.W.1.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

LAFS.910.W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

LAFS.910.W.1.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

LAFS.910.W.3.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

LAFS.910.L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

LAFS.910.L.1.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

LAFS.910.SL.1.1  Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

The Florida Mathematical Practices should be incorporated as appropriate.