M/J United States History Advanced   (#2100020)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

Primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of American history from the Exploration and Colonization period to the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to explore those fundamental ideas and events which occurred after Reconstruction.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.


Special Notes: Additional content that may be contained in the NAEP Grade 8 United States History assessment includes materialfrom all time periods on the following topics:

  • Change and Continuity in American Democracy: Ideas, Institutions, Events, Key Figures, and Controversies
  • The Gathering and Interactions of Peoples, Cultures, and Ideas
  • Economic and Technological Changes and Their Relationship to Society, Ideas, and the Environment
  • The Changing Role of America in the World

The NAEP frameworks for United States History may be accessed at http://www.nagb.org/content/nagb/assets/documents/publications/frameworks/historyframework.pdf

Instructional Practices

Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning:

1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.

2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.

3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.

4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.

5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

 

Florida’s Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking (B.E.S.T.) Standards
This course includes Florida’s B.E.S.T. ELA Expectations (EE) and Mathematical Thinking and Reasoning Standards (MTRs) for students. Florida educators should intentionally embed these standards within the content and their instruction as applicable. For guidance on the implementation of the EEs and MTRs, please visit https://www.cpalms.org/Standards/BEST_Standards.aspx and select the appropriate B.E.S.T. Standards package.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf

Additional Instructional Resources:
Kinsey Collection: http://www.thekinseycollection.com/the-kinsey-collection-on-itunes-u/

Qualifications

added elem ed cert options, per commissioner approval on 1/23/18

General Information

Course Number: 2100020
Abbreviated Title: M/J US HIST ADV
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Level: 3
Course Status: Draft - Course Pending Approval
Grade Level(s): 6,7,8

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Evaluating Constitutional Rights:

In this interactive tutorial, explore several landmark cases of the Supreme Court to see how the Court's decisions have impacted the rights of individuals and society throughout American history.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring The First Amendment:

In this interactive tutorial hosted by "Bill" O. Rights, learn in great detail about the five freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment: religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding Rule of Law:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about one of the most important principles in American democracy: rule of law.  You'll explore this important concept and learn about its application to a famous Supreme Court decision: United States v. Nixon.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Show Your Citizenship!:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the rights, obligations, and responsibilities of American citizenship.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Great Debate: Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll compare the viewpoints of the two groups on opposite sides of the great debate over ratifying the U.S. Constitution: Federalists and Anti-Federalists.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Know Your Rights: Examining the Bill of Rights:

In this interactive tutorial, analyze all 10 Amendments that make up the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution.  You'll learn not only about the rights and freedoms guaranteed by each, but also the limits of those rights.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Britain vs. America: What Led to the Declaration of Independence:

In this interactive tutorial, learn why Great Britain and her 13 American colonies split between 1763 and 1776.  At the end of this time span, Britain and America were at war, and the Declaration of Independence had announced the United States of America as a brand new nation, no longer colonies of Britain.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Declaration of Independence :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to analyze the ideas, grievances (complaints), and language found in the Declaration of Independence, one of the most important documents in the history of the United States.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding the Preamble :

Analyze the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution -- line by line, word by word -- in this interactive tutorial!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Confederation to Constitution:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the Articles of Confederation, our nation’s first written constitution.  You'll identify its major weaknesses and their consequences, and you'll explain the reasons why America's Founders replaced the Articles of Confederation with the government we still use today, the U.S. Constitution.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Colonists: What Were They Thinking?:

Learn how several famous documents influenced the views of American colonists when they sought their independence from Great Britain and formed their own government. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn about the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, and Thomas Paine’s Common Sense.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

Abraham Lincoln's Crossroads:

In this tutorial, you will play an interactive and educational game that invites you to learn about Abraham Lincoln's leadership and decisions during the Civil War era. As you explore and learn about the political choices he made, you'll get a chance to make the same decisions as Lincoln did and compare your choices to his. Can you think like Lincoln? Good luck!

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

Yorktown: Now or Never:

View a 10-part video on the Battle of Yorktown, the culminating battle of the Revolutionary War. With French aid, George Washington led American troops to a victory that ensured American independence.

In addition to the video, you will find primary source documents and a graphic organizer to help you analyze the Battle of Yorktown in greater detail.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

A More Perfect Union: George Washington and the Making of the Constitution:

This 3-part video from Mount Vernon details the struggles that led delegates from the 13 colonies to hold a Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. At this convention, under the leadership of George Washington, the delegates rejected the Articles of Confederation in favor of a new, stronger federal government. After the Constitution's ratification, Washington become the new nation's first president.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.