Humane Letters 2 History Honors   (#2109343)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

Humane Letters 2 - History is an integrated blending of History and Literature that includes content standards categorized as American History, World History, and Humanities. Emphasizing the classical approach to teaching and learning, this social studies course fosters reading, discussion, and writing based on ideas contained within the great books of the modern European tradition. This course is designed to be paired with Humane Letters 2 - Literature.

Students study European history from the Late Middle Ages to the end of World War Two, with a special focus placed on political and societal change. Within the scope of this course, these changes are explored through the study of works of history, political philosophy, and imaginative literature. Political and societal changes include, but are not limited to, the historical development and theoretical justification of modern constitutional government. Additionally, students will explore questions concerning the basis of property rights, the birth and growth of modern ideologies in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the causes and effects of revolution. Recommended texts for this course include, but are not limited to: Locke’s Second Treatise of Government and Rousseau’s Discourse on Inequality.

Standards-based course content for each time period should include, but not be limited to:

Late Middle Ages: Understand how the Black Death, the Hundred Years’ War, and tensions within the Medieval Church led to ruptures in medieval society that paved the way for the Renaissance.

The Renaissance: Determine how the Renaissance period opened the door for humanistic thinking, more nationalized monarchies, and open calls for social/political reform. Special emphasis may be placed the writings of Machiavelli, Castiglione and Mirandola.

The Reformation: Recognize the central tenets of the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, noting especially the diverse beliefs among Protestant groups and the social/political impact of the movement.

The Age of Religious Wars: Examine the violent nature of confessional wars across Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries, noting especially the gradual shift toward considerations of domestic and international society adopted by the politiques.

European State Consolidation (English Constitutionalism and French Absolutism): Analyze the means by which England and France consolidated political power in the hands of the state, noting especially the political theory behind Constitutionalism and Absolutism. Examine the intricacies of the English Civil War, the legacy of Oliver Cromwell, the significance of the Glorious Revolution, and counterexample of Louis XIV’s absolutism.

Scientific Revolution: Discuss the ideas associated with major thinkers of the 16th and 17th centuries who emphasized empiricism and a new philosophy of science. Explain why this new epistemology was “revolutionary” and was poised to supplant more traditional means of knowing.

18th–Century Thought and Life: Recognize the most salient aspects of the Old Regime, noting the social, political, economic, and intellectual tensions that existed therein that paved the way towards the French Revolution. Careful attention is given to the Enlightenment, including its major thinkers and their calls for reform of religion, politics and society.

The French Revolution and the Modern Nation-State: Discuss the political, intellectual, industrial, and societal themes that lead to the French Revolution and its aftermath. Recognize the common themes in the definition and formation of modern European nation-states.

19th-Centuray Thought, Politics, and Culture: Investigate the many new threads which are woven together to create the aspirations, ambitions, and tensions which set the stage for the World Wars.

The World Wars: Recognize historical facts about WWI and WWII.  Analyze the origins of these wars.  Discuss the relationship between the end of WWI and the beginning of WWII.  Examine how WWII created the early conditions of the Cold War and modernity more generally.

General Notes

Instructional Practices

The recommended primary mode of instruction in Humane Letters is the seminar, supplemented with direct instruction through lecture or coaching. The seminar format requires that students participate actively in their search for the fullest understanding of the texts under examination. While the instructor serves as a guide in the learning process, the students and the instructor together investigate and explore the many complex ideas presented in the texts. Students are expected to follow these rules governing the seminar format:

  • Students must come to class having read the assignment in its entirety before they can participate in seminar discussion
  • Students must mentally prepare serious questions for the class to consider during discussion.
  • Each student must attend fully to the discussion at hand and refrain from carrying on side discussions.
  • Students must limit their comments only to the selection assigned for homework, or previously discussed passages.
  • Students must support their observations, arguments, or claims with specific textual evidence.

Version Requirements

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

Literacy Standards in Social Studies
Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: {{AzureStorageLink}}/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf

General Information

Course Number: 2109343
Abbreviated Title: HUM LET 2 HIST HON
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Level: 3
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12
Graduation Requirement: World History

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

In the Driver's Seat: Character Interactions in Little Women:

Study excerpts from the classic American novel Little Women by Louisa May Alcott in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. Using excerpts from chapter eight of Little Women, you'll identify key characters and their actions. You'll also explain how interactions between characters contributes to the development of the plot. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What it Means to Give a Gift: How Allusions Contribute to Meaning in "The Gift of the Magi":

Examine how allusions contribute to meaning in excerpts from O. Henry's classic American short story “The Gift of the Magi." In this interactive tutorial, you'll determine how allusions in the text better develop the key story elements of setting, characters, and conflict and explain how the allusion to the Magi contributes to the story’s main message about what it means to give a gift.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Imagery in Shakespeare’s "Sonnet 18":

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Comparing Universal Themes in Shakespeare’s "Sonnet 18":

Study William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 18" to determine and compare two universal themes and how they were developed throughout the sonnet with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Form Contributes to Meaning in Shakespeare’s "Sonnet 18":

Explore the form and meaning of William Shakespeare's “Sonnet 18.”  In this interactive tutorial, you’ll examine how key words and phrases contribute to meaning in the sonnet, select the key features of a Shakespearean sonnet in the poem, identify the solution to a problem, and explain how the form of a Shakespearean sonnet contributes to the meaning of "Sonnet 18."

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Universal Themes in "The Gift of the Magi":

Analyze how O. Henry uses details to address the topics of value, sacrifice, and love in his famous short story, "The Gift of the Magi." In this interactive tutorial, you'll also determine two universal themes of the story. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Story Elements Interact in “The Gift of the Magi" – Part Two:

Explore key story elements in more excerpts from the classic American short story “The Gift of the Magi” by O. Henry.

In Part Two of this two-part series, you'll analyze how important information about two main characters is revealed through the context of the story’s setting and events in the plot. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to explain how character development, setting, and plot interact in "The Gift of the Magi."

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part One. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Story Elements Interact in “The Gift of the Magi" -- Part One:

Explore key story elements in the classic American short story “The Gift of the Magi” by O. Henry. Throughout this two-part tutorial, you'll analyze how important information about two main characters is revealed through the context of the story’s setting and events in the plot. By the end of this tutorial series, you should be able to explain how character development, setting, and plot interact in excerpts from this short story.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to view "How Story Elements Interact in 'The Gift of the Magi' -- Part Two."

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Archetypes – Part Two: Examining Archetypes in The Princess and the Goblin:

Read more from the fantasy novel The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald in Part Two of this three-part series. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to compare and contrast the archetypes of two characters in the novel.

Make sure to complete all three parts of this series!

Click HERE to view "Archetypes -- Part One: Examining an Archetype in The Princess and the Goblin."

Click HERE to view "Archetypes -- Part Three: Comparing and Contrasting Archetypes in Two Fantasy Stories." 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Archetypes – Part One: Examining an Archetype in The Princess and the Goblin:

Learn to determine the key traits of a main character named Princess Irene in excerpts from the fantasy novel The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald. In this interactive tutorial, you’ll also identify her archetype and explain how textual details about her character support her archetype.  

Make sure to complete all three parts of this series! 

Click HERE to view "Archetypes -- Part Two: Examining Archetypes in The Princess and the Goblin."

Click HERE to view "Archetypes -- Part Three: Comparing and Contrasting Archetypes in Two Fantasy Stories." 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power to Cure or Impair: The Importance of Setting in "The Yellow Wallpaper" -- Part One:

Learn to identify aspects of setting and character as you analyze several excerpts from “The Yellow Wallpaper," a chilling short story by Charlotte Perkins Gilman that explores the impact on its narrator of being confined to mostly one room. You'll also determine how the narrator’s descriptions of the story’s setting better reveal her emotional and mental state.

This interactive tutorial is Part One in a two-part series. By the end of Part Two, you should be able to explain how the narrator changes through her interaction with the setting. Click below to launch Part Two.

The Power to Cure or Impair: The Importance of Setting in 'The Yellow Wallpaper' -- Part Two 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power to Cure or Impair: The Importance of Setting in "The Yellow Wallpaper" -- Part Two:

Continue to examine several excerpts from the chilling short story “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, which explores the impact on its narrator of being confined to mostly one room. In Part Two of this tutorial series, you'll determine how the narrator’s descriptions of the story’s setting reveal its impact on her emotional and mental state. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to explain how the narrator changes through her interaction with the setting.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to launch "The Power to Cure or Impair: The Importance of Setting in 'The Yellow Wallpaper' -- Part One." 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Mystery of the Past: How the Form of a Villanelle Contributes to Meaning in "The House on the Hill":

Explore the mysterious poem “The House on the Hill” by Edwin Arlington Robinson in this interactive tutorial. As you explore the poem's message about the past, you’ll identify the features of a villanelle in the poem. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to explain how the form of a villanelle contributes to the poem's meaning.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Giant of Size and Power – Part Two: How the Form of a Sonnet Contributes to Meaning in "The New Colossus":

Continue to explore the significance of the famous poem “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus, lines from which are engraved on the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty. 

In Part Two of this two-part series, you’ll identify the features of a sonnet in the poem "The New Colossus." By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to explain how the form of a sonnet contributes to the poem's meaning. 

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two.

Click  to launch "A Giant of Size and Power -- Part One: Exploring the Significance of 'The New Colossus.'"

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Beginning of The Red Umbrella – Part Two: How Setting Influences Characters:

Continue to explore excerpts from the beginning of the historical fiction novel The Red Umbrella by Christina Diaz Gonzalez in Part Two of this two-part series. In Part Two, you'll examine how setting influences characters.

Make sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE to launch "Analyzing the Beginning of The Red Umbrella -- Part One: How Setting Influences Events." 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Giant of Size and Power -- Part One: Exploring the Significance of "The New Colossus":

In Part One, explore the significance of the famous poem “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus, lines from which are engraved on the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty. 

This famous poem also happens to be in the form of a sonnet. In Part Two of this two-part series, you’ll identify the features of a sonnet in the poem. By the end of this tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the form of a sonnet contributes to the poem's meaning. Make sure to complete both parts!

Click HERE to launch "A Giant of Size and Power -- Part Two: How the Form of a Sonnet Contributes to Meaning in 'The New Colossus.'"

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Beginning of The Red Umbrella – Part One: How Setting Influences Events:

Explore excerpts from the beginning of the historical fiction novel The Red Umbrella by Christina Diaz Gonzalez in this two-part series. In Part One, you'll examine how setting influences events. In Part Two, you'll examine how setting influences characters.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

CER: Writing a Great Paragraph:

Learn how to write a great "CER" paragraph that includes a claim, evidence, and reasoning with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reading into Words with Multiple Meanings:

Explore Robert Frost's poem "Mending Wall" and examine words, phrases, and lines with multiple meanings. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze how these multiple meanings can affect a reader’s interpretation of the poem.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part Two:

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part, interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth. 

This tutorial is the second in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part One:

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part, interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth.  

This tutorial is the first in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Don't Plagiarize: Cite Your Sources!:

Learn more about that dreaded word--plagiarism--in this interactive tutorial that's all about citing your sources, creating a Works Cited page, and avoiding academic dishonesty!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Avoiding Plagiarism and Citing Sources:

Learn more about that dreaded word--plagiarism--in this interactive tutorial that's all about citing your sources and avoiding academic dishonesty!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part series. This tutorial is Part Two. In this tutorial, you will continue to examine excerpts from Emerson's essay that focus on the topic of traveling. You'll examine word meanings and determine the connotations of specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of this portion of the essay.

Make sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 1:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part interactive tutorial series. You will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about the emotions or associations that are connected to specific words. Finally, you will analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of these excerpts.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Meaning in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this interactive two-part tutorial. This tutorial is Part Two. In this two-part series, you will learn to enhance your experience of Emerson's essay by analyzing his use of the word "genius." You will analyze Emerson's figurative meaning of "genius" and how he develops and refines the meaning of this word over the course of the essay.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Meaning in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 1:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this interactive two-part tutorial. In Part One, you’ll learn to enhance your experience of a text by analyzing its use of a word’s figurative meaning. Specifically, you'll examine Emerson's figurative meaning of the key term "genius." In Part Two, you’ll learn how to track the development of a word’s figurative meaning over the course of a text. 

Make sure to complete both parts of the tutorial! Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part Two:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, including word meanings, subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and emotions connected to specific words. In this interactive tutorial, you will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to open Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part One:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about emotions connected to specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series on Poe's "The Raven." Click HERE to open Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voices of Jekyll and Hyde, Part Two:

Get ready to travel back in time to London, England during the Victorian era in this interactive tutorial that uses text excerpts from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. You should complete Part One before beginning this tutorial. In Part Two, you will read excerpts from the last half of the story and practice citing evidence to support analysis of a literary text. In the third tutorial in this series, you’ll learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence from this story. 

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click to HERE launch Part One. Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

Analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including minorities, during WWII.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Its all about Mood: Bradbury's "Zero Hour":

Learn how authors create mood in a story through this interactive tutorial. You'll read a science fiction short story by author Ray Bradbury and analyze how he uses images, sound, dialogue, setting, and characters' actions to create different moods. This tutorial is Part One in a two-part series. In Part Two, you'll use Bradbury's story to help you create a Found Poem that conveys multiple moods.

When you've completed Part One, click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part four of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voices of Jekyll and Hyde, Part One:

Practice citing evidence to support analysis of a literary text as you read excerpts from one of the most famous works of horror fiction of all time, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. 

This tutorial is Part One of a three-part tutorial. In Part Two, you'll continue your analysis of the text. In Part Three, you'll learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence from this story. Make sure to complete all three parts! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

War and Peace? (Part 2 of 2):

Experience the end of World War I and the Paris Peace Conference that followed, from the point of view of the United States and President Woodrow Wilson.  In part 2 of this two-part, interactive tutorial, you'll also learn about the Treaty of Versailles that ended the war with Germany, about the League of Nations, and about Wilson's failure to make the U.S. a part of the newly created international organization.  

Click below to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

War and Peace? (Part 1 of 2):

Learn about the end of World War I and the Paris Peace Conference that followed, from the point of view of the United States and President Woodrow Wilson. In part one of this two-part, interactive tutorial, you'll also learn about the Treaty of Versailles that ended the war with Germany, about the League of Nations, and about Wilson's failure to make the U.S. a part of the newly created international organization.  

Click below to open Part 2

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and key details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part three of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 2 of 4):

Learn how to identify the central idea and key details of a text, as well as how to write an effective summary in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second tutorial in a four-part series that examines how scientists are using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. 

This tutorial is part two of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 1 of 4):

Learn about how researchers are using drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, to study glaciers in Peru. In this interactive tutorial you will practice citing text evidence when answering questions about a text.

This tutorial is part one of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Over Here: Americans at Home in World War I (Part 2 of 2):

Learn how Americans on the home front experienced World War 1 while helping the U.S.A win the war.  In this 2-part interactive tutorial series, you'll learn about war bonds and the changes WWI brought to America's economy.  You'll also learn how propaganda and new laws against wartime dissent curbed Americans' civil liberties.  Finally, you'll learn how the war lead to increased opportunities for women and African Americans. 

Click below to open Part 1.

Check out the companion series, "Over There: Americans at War in World War I." Click below to open parts 1 and 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Over Here: Americans at Home in World War I (Part 1 of 2):

Learn how Americans on the home front experienced World War 1 while helping the U.S.A win the war.  In this 2-part interactive tutorial series, you'll learn about war bonds and the changes WWI brought to America's economy.  You'll also learn how propaganda and new laws against wartime dissent curbed Americans' civil liberties.  Finally, you'll learn how the war lead to increased opportunities for women and African Americans.  

Click below to open Part 2.

Check out the companion series, Over There: Americans at War in World War I. Click below to open parts 1 and 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Avoiding Plagiarism: It's Not Magic:

Learn how to avoid plagiarism in this interactive tutorial. You will also learn how to follow a standard format for citation and how to format your research paper using MLA style. Along the way, you will also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series on research writing.

Be sure to complete Part One first. Click to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Progressive Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt (Part 2 of 2):

Learn about the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt, in this 2-part interactive tutorial.  "TR," as he was known, pursued a bold progressive agenda that changed America and the presidency.  

Click below to open part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Progressive Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt (Part 1 of 2):

Learn about the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt, in this 2-part interactive tutorial.  "TR," as he was known, pursued a bold progressive agenda that changed America and the presidency.  

Click below to open part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

World War II Begins (Part 2 of 2):

Learn how World War II began in Europe and Asia in Part 2 of this interactive tutorial.  You'll learn about the aggression of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan that threatened world peace, and you'll learn how the United States responded with isolationism...until the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 caused America to join the Allies.  

Click below to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

World War II Begins (Part 1 of 2):

Learn how World War II began in Europe and Asia in Part 1 of this interactive tutorial. You'll learn about the aggression of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan that threatened world peace, and you'll learn how the United States responded with isolationism...until the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 caused America to join the Allies.  

Click below to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 2:

Practice literacy skills while learning more about the Pullman Strike of 1894 in this interactive tutorial.

This is the second tutorial in a two-part series. Click to launch Part 1 where you'll learn the history behind the same event.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 1:

Learn the history behind the Pullman Strike of 1894 in part 1 of this interactive tutorial.  In Part 2, you'll practice your literacy skills while learning more about the same event! 

Click  to open part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Cold War at Home: McCarthyism and the Red Scare:

Learn about the Second Red Scare that swept America in the early years of the Cold War.  In this interactive tutorial, you'll also learn about McCarthyism, the era of suspicion and persecution that gets its name from the actions of notorious Senator Joseph McCarthy.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and the use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series, so be sure to complete both parts.

Check out part two—Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address:

Examine a famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln, his 2nd Inaugural Address. This speech, given a month before his assassination, is considered by many to be one of his most eloquent and moving speeches. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to determine Lincoln's purpose for his 2nd Inaugural Address, analyze his word choice, and identify his use of parallel structure. Finally, you should be able to put all of these things together to analyze how Lincoln's word choice and use of parallel structure contributed to the purpose for his speech.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Happy Halloween! Textual Evidence and Inferences:

Cite text evidence and make inferences about the "real" history of Halloween in this spooky interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Plagiarism: What Is It? How Can I Avoid It?:

Learn more about that dreaded word--plagiarism--in this interactive tutorial that's all about citing your sources and avoiding academic dishonesty!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Cyberwar! Citing Evidence and Making Inferences:

Learn how to cite evidence and draw inferences in this interactive tutorial. Using an informational text about cyber attacks, you'll practice identifying text evidence and making inferences based on the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Go For the Gold: Writing Claims & Using Evidence:

Learn how to define and identify claims being made within a text. This tutorial will also show you how evidence can be used effectively to support the claim being made. Lastly, this tutorial will help you write strong, convincing claims of your own.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Coming to America: The Era of Mass Immigration:

Learn about the era of mass immigration from 1865 to 1914, when as many as 25 million immigrants entered the United States, many of them through Ellis Island.  In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn where immigrants came from, why they emigrated, how they adjusted to life in the U.S.,  and compare the experiences of European and Asian immigrants.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Captains of Industry: The Second Industrial Revolution:

Learn some of the differences between the First and Second Industrial Revolutions, as well as key developments that drove the Second Industrial Revolution with this interactive tutorial. You will also learn about some of the leaders of industry during this era, including John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, and J.P. Morgan, and examine how their development of major industries and business practices affected America’s economy during the Second Industrial Revolution.

Check out the related tutorial: 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Postwar Blues...and Reds:

Learn about the years immediately following World War I: 1919 and 1920 in this interactive tutorial.  These were dangerous years of economic depression, racial violence, and anti-immigrant nativism in the United States.  You'll learn about the Red Scare, the Palmer Raids, Sacco and Vanzetti, and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Caused the Civil War?:

Explore the central causes of America's bloodiest conflict--the Civil War--in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Supreme Court in Action:

Learn about landmark cases decided by the Supreme Court in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, including Brown vs. Board of Education, Miranda vs. Arizona, and Roe vs. Wade.  This interactive tutorial covers the backgrounds, outcomes, and impacts of 8 important cases in detail. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

"The Last Leaf" – Making Inferences:

Learn how to make inferences based on the information included in the text in this interactive tutorial. Using the short story "The Last Leaf" by O. Henry, you'll practice identifying both the explicit and implicit information in the story. You'll apply your own reasoning to make inferences based on what is stated both explicitly and implicitly in the text. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

"Beary" Good Details:

Join Baby Bear to answer questions about key details in his favorite stories with this interactive tutorial. Learn about characters, setting, and events as you answer who, where, and what questions.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Surviving Extreme Conditions:

In this tutorial, you will practice identifying relevant evidence within a text as you read excerpts from Jack London's short story, "To Build a Fire." Then, you'll practice your writing skills as you draft a short response using examples of relevant evidence from the story.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Texts:

Learn how to make inferences using the novel Hoot in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn how to identify both explicit and implicit information in the story to make inferences about characters and events.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Joy That Kills:

Learn how to make inferences when reading a fictional text using the textual evidence provided. In this tutorial, you'll read the short story "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin. You'll practice identifying what is directly stated in the text and what requires the use of inference. You'll practice making your own inferences and supporting them with evidence from the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Assessments

Quiz: Imperialism :

Test your knowledge of American imperialism and the Age of Empire with this 9-question multiple choice quiz!

Type: Assessment

Quiz: The Gilded Age :

Test your knowledge of the Gilded Age with this 10-question multiple choice quiz!

Type: Assessment

Tutorials

U.S. History Overview: Reconstruction to the Great Depression:

Learn about key events in American history from the Reconstruction Era to the start of the Great Depression in this tutorial video provided by Khan Academy. The video touches on the Reconstruction Amendments, Jim Crow laws, the Coinage Act and the Panic of 1873, the Spanish-American War, World War I, and the 18th and 19th Amendments.

Type: Tutorial

Origins of the Cold War:

In this tutorial video from Khan Academy, you'll learn about the origins of the Cold War. This unusual conflict pitted the United States (and its Western democratic allies) against the Soviet Union (and its communist satellite states). Although these nations never went to war directly, their rivalry would shape the world for decades!

Type: Tutorial

Communism:

In this tutorial video brought to you by Khan Academy, you'll learn about the economic system called communism. This video explores the origins and history of communism and explains its connections to authoritarian forms of government.

Type: Tutorial

The Age of Empire:

Learn about the factors that drove United States imperialism and the acquisition of territories in this short video provided by Khan Academy. Helpful graphics illustrate the content.

Type: Tutorial

The Gilded Age: Part 2:

Learn about the Second Industrial Revolution and the expansion of railroads across America, new inventions like the elevator and telephone, and the rise of captains of industry like Andrew Carnegie in a short video by Khan Academy. Helpful graphics illustrate the content. Enjoy this journey back to the Gilded Age!

Type: Tutorial

The Gilded Age: Part 1:

Receive an introduction to the Gilded Age in this short video provided by Khan Academy. The Gilded Age, which fell between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the Progressive era, was a time of intense industrialization that saw the rise of captains of industry like John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie. Enjoy this quick trip through American history!

Type: Tutorial

Whose Land is This?:

Learn about America's history in this interactive tutorial. This webisode from PBS's History: A Freedom of Us provides detailed informational texts, primary source documents that include photographs, and online quizzes to help you explore aspects of this complex time in American history. You'll learn about the 1862 Homestead Act, the rise of immigration, different aspects of the immigrant experience, the expansion of the American West, and the violent conflicts that resulted in the deaths of Native Americans and the removal and relocation of different tribes onto reservations.

Type: Tutorial

Remembering Pearl Harbor: Attack Map:

In this tutorial, you'll interact with a chronological map of the attacks on Pearl Harbor. Trace the timeline of events as you listen to, read, and explore the devastating sneak attack that brought the U.S. into World War II on December 7, 1941.

Type: Tutorial

Habeas Corpus: The Guantanamo Cases:

In this tutorial, you will view an outstanding video on the meaning and history of habeas corpus: the law that prevents a person being held in jail or prison without being able to hear and contest the charges being brought against them. You'll then learn about 4 recent Supreme Court cases where habeas corpus has been called into question in the context of the global war on terror.

Type: Tutorial

The Living Room Candidate:

In this resource, you will experience a blast from the past! Go on a journey through U.S. political history as you view various campaign ads from past presidential elections. From the earliest television ads aired in 1952 to ads from 2012, this is a one stop shop with over 300 political commercials available to watch. Each election year contains information to set the context for the collection of commercials, as well as information about the major candidates who ran, and a map that displays the final election results. Enjoy this journey into America's political past!

Type: Tutorial

Sights and Sounds of the Roaring Twenties:

In this tutorial, you will explore an interactive map featuring video and audio clips that help you explore the sights and sounds of New York City in the 1920s. During this time in American history, life for Americans was in a constant state of change - culturally, politically, socially, and economically. Things were booming, especially in New York City. Enjoy this interactive exploration through an exciting time in American history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S History: The Industrial Economy:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind tour of America during the Industrial Revolution. After the Civil War, many changes in technology and ideas gave rise to a new industrialism. You'll learn about industry leaders of the time, such as Vanderbilt, Carnegie, Rockefeller, and Morgan. Enjoy this "crash course" review about trusts, combinations, and how the government responded to these new business practices!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Progressive Era:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era in American history. During this time, people were attempting to solve governmental and societal issues, all while trying to better implement equality for all. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

How to Read a Document, Part 2: Analyzing FDR's Inaugural Address:

 

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

How to Read a Document, Part 1: Source Identification:

Learn how to "think like a historian" in this brief video from Khan Academy. Your hosts explain the difference between primary and secondary sources and analyze the beginning of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's First Inaugural Address.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Thinking Like a Historian:

Learn how to "think like a historian" in this brief video from Khan Academy. The speaker describes how thinking like a historian entails using the skills of a storyteller, a scientist, and a lawyer!

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Yorktown: Now or Never:

View a 10-part video on the Battle of Yorktown, the culminating battle of the Revolutionary War. With French aid, George Washington led American troops to a victory that ensured American independence.

In addition to the video, you will find primary source documents and a graphic organizer to help you analyze the Battle of Yorktown in greater detail.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.