Engaged Citizenship through Service-Learning 2   (#2104360)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

This course provides applications and opportunities for leadership in the areas of service-learning, civic responsibility, and civic engagement. Academic, personal, and career skills needed for effective service-learning project implementation will be taught and applied through structured service projects that meet real school and/or community needs. Students will actively participate in meaningful service-learning experiences of at least 40 hours' duration.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:

  1. Students, working individually or in small or large groups, will investigate, quantify, and choose among issues and needs that can be addressed.
  2. Students will design and then implement one or more service-learning projects to address identified needs through direct, indirect, advocacy, or research-focused action. Projects will involve meaningful partnerships.
  3. Students will conduct reflection activities to measure and record information about the service-learning activities and their impacts.
  4. Students will demonstrate KSAs (knowledge, skills, or abilities) gained from projects through project-developed products and public presentations that educate others about the needs/issues addressed, activities conducted, impacts measured, and/or how others can also meet needs through service.

All of the above activities may be counted toward the service-learning 40-hour requirement. Activities can range widely and occur within or beyond the school. For more information about service-learning, see the Florida Department of Education Web site at www.fldoe.org/family/learnserve.asp.

Language Arts benchmarks are addressed as students read, write, create documents, and make public presentations about needs and activities to address them. Social Studies benchmarks include analyzing community issues, coming up with solutions, and conducting service projects. Math benchmarks are met as students chart and graph data as part of issue investigation, project design, demonstration, and/or reflection. Health and Physical Education are addressed as projects include discussion and learning related to safety, liability, interpersonal skills, conflict avoidance, appraising outcomes and impacts on others, maintaining appropriate behavior, etc., in the students' interaction with others.

Mathematics Benchmark Guidance - Social Studies instruction should include opportunities for students to interpret and create representations of historical events and concepts using mathematical tables, charts, and graphs.

After successfully completing this course, the student will:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of service-learning, the types of service-learning, and its importance in a participatory democracy.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to identify school/community needs and propose solutions that can be implemented through service-learning.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to identify and analyze different points of view to gain an understanding of diverse backgrounds and perspectives and their value.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to investigate significant needs, plan and implement service-learning projects to address them, evaluate project effectiveness, and present the information to an authentic audience.
  5. Demonstrate use of effective self-assessment and reflection strategies (e.g., verbal, written, artistic, and non-verbal activities to demonstrate learning, understanding, and changes in students' knowledge, skills and/or abilities).
  6. Demonstrate effective use of facilitative communication skills (e.g., writing, speaking, listening, questioning, paraphrasing, non-verbal communication, non-judgmental response).
  7. Assess and evaluate impacts of their efforts, measuring outputs and impacts not only on the communities being served, but also on her/himself.
  8. Provide documentation of activities and the minimum 40 hours of participation in one or more approved service-learning projects.

For this second-level high school course, the expectation is that students will not only engage in more service-learning hours and activities than students in the first level, but will also show higher levels of responsibility and leadership in project design and implementation. Additional roles can include helping other students or teachers with aspects of project design and implementation, and teaching/presenting to other groups inside and beyond the school about course-based projects.

Literacy Standards in Social Studies
Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf

Qualifications

As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

Any field when certification reflects a bachelor or higher degree.

General Information

Course Number: 2104360
Abbreviated Title: ENG CITIZ SERV LRNG2
Number of Credits: Half credit (.5)
Course Length: Semester (S)
Course Type: Elective Course
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Word Sleuth: Using Context Clues:

Learn to use context clues, including synonyms, antonyms, and inferences, to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Movies Part 2: What’s the Spread?:

Follow Jake along as he relates box plots with other plots and identifies possible outliers in real-world data from surveys of moviegoers' ages in part 2 in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 2 of 2-part series, click HERE to view part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Movies Part 1: What's the Spread?:

Follow Jake as he displays real-world data by creating box plots showing the 5 number summary and compares the spread of the data from surveys of the ages of moviegoers in part 1 of this interactive tutorial.

This is part 1 of 2-part series, click HERE to view part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Unleashed:

Learn 12 new academic vocabulary words in this interactive tutorial! You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part Two:

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this interactive tutorial series. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations.

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Our Mothers’ Gardens: An Account in Two Mediums:

Learn about author Alice Walker and the influence and legacy of her mother, Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you’ll read excerpts from “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,” an essay written by Alice Walker. You’ll also watch a video titled “A Black Writer in the South,” which highlights important aspects of Alice Walker’s childhood. You'll also analyze various accounts of a subject, in this case, the influence and legacy of Alice Walker’s mother, as told through two different mediums: text and video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self":

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech on women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal her point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help express an author's point of view.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Two: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Two, you will read more of Kennedy's speech, identify the smaller claims in this part of his speech, and examine his reasons and evidence.

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part One: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part One, you will read the beginning of Kennedy's speech, examine his reasons and evidence in this section, and identify the main claim of his argument. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part Two):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part interactive tutorial. In Part 2, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to complete all three parts!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part Three):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part interactive tutorial. In Part 3, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to open the first two parts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part One):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part interactive tutorial. In Part 1, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to complete all three parts!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two:

This is Part Two of a two-part tutorial series. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying a speaker's purpose using a speech by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. You will examine her use of rhetorical appeals, including ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos. Finally, you'll evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's use of rhetorical appeals.

Be sure to complete Part One first. Click here to launch PART ONE.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One:

This is Part One of a two-part tutorial series. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying a speaker's purpose using a speech by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. You will examine her use of rhetorical appeals, including ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos. Finally, you'll evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's use of rhetorical appeals. 

Click here to launch PART TWO.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Poem in 2 Voices: Jekyll and Hyde:

Learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence drawn from a literary text: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson.

You should complete Part One and Part Two of this series before beginning Part Three.   

Click HERE to launch Part One. Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Playing with Words: Changing Word Forms:

Learn how to transform words into other words, including nouns into verbs, verbs into adjectives, adjectives into adverbs, and much more with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Mastery :

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Unraveling the Seams: How Authors Unfold Events - Part Two:

Learn to identify the text structure and its purpose within a nonfiction text. In this two-part tutorial series, you'll read excerpts from Maya Angelou's autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. You'll examine how the text structure contributes to meaning in the text, and you'll analyze how the order of events and relationships between events add to the meaning as well.

Make sure to complete both parts. Click here to launch PART ONE.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 2 of 4):

Learn how to identify the central idea and important details of a text, as well as how to write an effective summary in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second tutorial in a four-part series that examines how scientists are using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. 

This tutorial is part two of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 1 of 4):

Learn about how researchers are using drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, to study glaciers in Peru. In this interactive tutorial, you will practice citing text evidence when answering questions about a text.

This tutorial is part one of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Progressivism After Roosevelt: Taft and Wilson, Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the Progressive Era and two presidents who advanced progressive policies: William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson.  You'll also learn about the 1912 Election!  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Unraveling the Seams: How Authors Unfold Events - Part One:

Learn to identify the text structure and its purpose within a nonfiction text. In this two-part tutorial series, you'll read excerpts from Maya Angelou's autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. You'll examine how the text structure contributes to meaning in the text, and you'll analyze how the order of events and relationships between events add to the meaning as well.

Make sure to complete both parts. Click here to launch PART TWO

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Progressivism After Roosevelt: Taft and Wilson, Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the Progressive Era and two presidents who advanced progressive policies: William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson. You'll also learn about the 1912 Election!

CLICK HERE to open Part 2. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Progressive Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt.  "TR," as he was known, pursued a bold, progressive agenda that transformed America and the presidency.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Progressive Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn in detail about the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt.  "TR," as he was known, pursued a bold, progressive agenda that transformed America and the presidency.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 4 of 4):

Practice creating a concluding paragraph for an argumentative essay. This tutorial will focus on four elements of an effective conclusion: transitions, summary, synthesis, and a gift.

This interactive tutorial is part 4 in a 4-part series about writing an argumentative essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 3 of 4):

Practice creating a body paragraph for an argumentative essay on e-waste. This interactive tutorial will focus on four elements of an effective body paragraph: transitions; the topic sentence; reasons and evidence; and a brief wrap up.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 in a 4-part series about writing an argumentative essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 2 of 4):

Learn to create an organized, detailed introductory paragraph for an argumentative essay using the H.E.A.R.T. approach. H.E.A.R.T. is an acronym that standards for hook the reader, establish the context, address the argument, reveal the main points, and tie it together with transitions.

This interactive tutorial is part 2 in a 4-part series about writing an argumentative essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 1 of 4):

Learn how to create an outline to help you prepare to write an essay. You will read an informational text about technotrash, also called electronic waste or e-waste. Then, you will work on creating an outline that could help you write an argumentative essay about this topic. The outline will include a claim/thesis statement, main ideas, reasons, evidence, counterclaims, and rebuttals.  

This interactive tutorial is part 1 in a 4-part series about writing an argumentative essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste 

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary in Action:

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Power:

Review strategies for acquiring new vocabulary and then learn fifteen new words in this interactive tutorial. You'll also practice using the words in a variety of ways to help you add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring and Gathering Vocabulary:

Learn several ways to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words, including context clues, word parts, and dictionary skills. In this interactive tutorial, you'll apply these strategies to text passages from John Muir's book A Thousand-mile Walk to the Gulf, which includes vivid descriptions of Florida in the late 1800s.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Words and Phrases with the Gettysburg Address:

Read and examine Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address in this interactive tutorial. First, you'll practice using context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in the famous text. Next, you'll analyze Lincoln's specific word choice throughout the speech and examine how it conveys his tone or attitude.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Powerful Rhetoric: Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how speakers use rhetoric to achieve their purpose. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how speakers can achieve their purpose through the use of pathos, ethos, and logos. Using excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress," you'll analyze how speakers use rhetoric to make their case effectively.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Cost of Indifference: Determining the Central Idea:

Remember the Holocaust and consider the cost of indifference as you read selected excerpts from texts written by the late Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel. In this interactive tutorial, you'll look carefully at his words so that you may think critically and deeply about his central ideas. You'll also identify the important supporting details of a central idea and explain how the central idea is refined by specific details.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents:

In this tutorial, you'll practice identifying and analyzing how specific concepts are addressed in texts from two different time periods. The featured texts include the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. You'll practice analyzing the similarities and differences in how the two texts address certain concepts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding and Using Context Clues with the Help of Patrick Henry:

Learn how to identify context clues in a nonfiction text to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read excerpts from Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virginia Convention." You'll learn strategies for applying context clues to make predictions about the meanings of unfamiliar words. Finally, you'll practice using dictionary entries to confirm your predictions of unfamiliar word meanings.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Get More of the Scoop: Analyzing Text and Video Accounts of a Subject:

Learn how to analyze accounts of the same subject expressed in different mediums. In this interactive tutorial, you'll compare and contrast the details included in a short text with those included in a short video. We'll use President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address to examine how certain details are presented and emphasized differently in each medium. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Analyzing the Use of Rhetoric:

Learn how to identify and analyze a speaker's use of rhetoric and rhetorical techniques. In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine the art of rhetoric as well as Aristotle's Rhetorical Triangle. We'll analyze the use of ethos, pathos, and logos in several historical speeches. We'll also analyze how speakers convey their point of view about a topic through the use of various rhetorical techniques, including repetition and rhetorical questions.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

President Ronald Reagan Speaks to the "Enemy":

Learn to analyze evidence in an informational text using excerpts from a famous speech by President Ronald Reagan: "Address to Students at Moscow State University." In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying what the text states both directly and indirectly. You'll also practice making inferences based on the specific textual evidence presented in the speech. Along the way, you'll learn some important background information on the Cold War between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Assessments

Quiz: America in the 1920s:

Test your knowledge of the "Roaring Twenties" with a 9-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy. Good luck!

Type: Assessment

Quiz: America in the 21st Century:

Test your knowledge of America in the 21st century with this nine-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy.

Type: Assessment

Quiz: 1990s America:

Test your knowledge of America in the 1990s with this 7-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy.

Type: Assessment

Quiz: 1980s America :

Test your knowledge of America in the 1980s in this ten-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy.

Type: Assessment

Quiz: Progressivism :

Test your knowledge of the Progressive era with this 5-question multiple choice quiz!

Type: Assessment

Perspectives Video: Expert

Mathematically Exploring the Wakulla Caves:

The tide is high!  How can we statistically prove there is a relationship between the tides on the Gulf Coast and in a fresh water spring 20 miles from each other?

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Problem-Solving Tasks

Speed Trap:

The purpose of this task is to allow students to demonstrate an ability to construct boxplots and to use boxplots as the basis for comparing distributions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Words and Music II:

The purpose of this task is to assess (1) ability to distinguish between an observational study and an experiment and (2) understanding of the role of random assignment to experimental groups in an experiment.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

SAT Scores:

This problem solving task challenges students to answer probability questions about SAT scores, using distribution and mean to solve the problem.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Haircut Costs:

This problem could be used as an introductory lesson to introduce group comparisons and to engage students in a question they may find amusing and interesting.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Should We Send Out a Certificate?:

The purpose of this task is to have students complete normal distribution calculations and to use properties of normal distributions to draw conclusions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Do You Fit in This Car?:

This task requires students to use the normal distribution as a model for a data distribution. Students must use given means and standard deviations to approximate population percentages.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Random Walk III:

The task provides a context to calculate discrete probabilities and represent them on a bar graph.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: United States v. Lopez (1995):

Learn more about the 1995 landmark Supreme Court decision U.S. v. Lopez. In this case, the Supreme Court ruled that Congress could not ban the possession of firearms within "gun-free school zones." The decision touched on issues of gun control, federalism, and the powers of Congress under the Commerce Clause.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

60-Second Presidents: Barack Obama:

View a brief, funny video about the 44th President, Barack Obama, who passed healthcare reform over the objections of a hostile Congress.

Type: Tutorial

Majority Rules: New York v. United States (1992):

Learn the historical context for a landmark Supreme Court decision, New York v. United States,in this short interactive tutorial. This case dealt with federal laws regarding radioactive waste removal in the late 20th century. You'll have a chance to evaluate the case on your terms before seeing how the justices actually ruled. Enjoy!

Type: Tutorial

Theodore Roosevelt & the United Mine Strike:

In this short video, learn about how President Theodore Roosevelt mediated a labor dispute, the Coal Strike of 1902, and how critics charged him with violating the Constitution.

Type: Tutorial

Trust Busting: Theodore Roosevelt:

Learn about President Theodore Roosevelt, a progressive who believed in using the power of the government to restore economic opportunities and correct injustices in American society. This short video explores Roosevelt's groundbreaking work as a trust-buster.

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Bill Clinton:

View a brief, funny video about the 42nd President, Bill Clinton, who oversaw a strong economy in the 1990s but became only the second president ever to face impeachment.

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: George H.W. Bush:

View a brief, funny video about the 41st President, George H.W. Bush, a one-term president who oversaw the end of the Cold War and the Persian Gulf War.

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: George W. Bush:

View a brief video about the 43rd President, George W. Bush, who was in office on September 11, 2001 and responded by declaring a global "War on Terror."

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Ronald Reagan:

View a brief, funny video about the 40th President, Ronald Reagan, the Hollywood actor who shaped the politics of the 1980s and became a Republican Party icon!

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: William Howard Taft:

View a brief, funny video about the 27th President, William Howard Taft, a progressive who had the difficult task of following in the footsteps of his mentor, Theodore Roosevelt!

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Theodore Roosevelt:

View a brief, funny video about our 26th President, Theodore Roosevelt, the progressive, trustbuster, and canal builder!

Type: Tutorial

Becoming Free:

Explore key events from the 1970s, 80s, 90s, and early 2000s in this webisode from PBS. During these decades, America closed out the Vietnam War era, saw the collapse of communism and the end of the Cold War, and experienced a rise in terrorist attacks against Americans abroad and on American soil. In this resource you can examine primary source documents and photographs, listen to segments of key speeches, examine a timeline and glossary, take a quiz, and explore additional resources connected to this era. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: George H.W. Bush and the End of the Cold War:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through George H.W. Bush's one-term presidency, which saw the end of the Cold War and the successful Gulf War in Iraq. During this time America continued to boom economically, but while one conflict ended, others would soon pop up in Africa and the Middle East. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Reagan Revolution:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the 1980s and President Ronald Reagan's two terms in office. President Reagan is often credited for a strong economy and for ending the Cold War. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Clinton Years, or the 1990s:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through recent history and learn about America in the 1990s. During this time President Bill Clinton oversaw globalization and a strong economy linked to the rise of the Internet, but his successes didn't prevent his own impeachment... Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Terrorism, War, and Bush :

In this tutorial video, you'll learn about the George W. Bush administration and America during the early 2000s. From the controversial Election of 2000, to the terrorist attacks that took place on 9/11, the 2000s were marked by domestic and foreign crises. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Progressive Presidents:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era. You'll specifically look at the domestic and foreign policies of 3 presidents: Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft, and Woodrow Wilson, all of whom had progressive ideas about how government should be operated. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Economic Malaise:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind tour through America in the 1970s. Presidents Ford and Carter were the nation's chief executives during this time, and both are usually considered "failed" presidents for their inability to improve America's economic decline over the course of the decade. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Gilded Age Politics:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the Gilded Age, a period in American history where "politics were marked by a number of phenomenons, most of them having to do with corruption." These events led to populism and eventually to new legislation that regulated government and political corruption. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Progressive Era:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era in American history. During this time, people were attempting to solve governmental and societal issues, all while trying to better implement equality for all. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Population Demographic Lab:

This lab simulation allows you to use real demographic data, collected by the US Census Bureau, to analyze and make predictions centered around demographic trends. You will explore factors that impact the birth, death and immigration rate of a population and learn how the population transitions having taken place globally.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Yorktown: Now or Never:

View a 10-part video on the Battle of Yorktown, the culminating battle of the Revolutionary War. With French aid, George Washington led American troops to a victory that ensured American independence.

In addition to the video, you will find primary source documents and a graphic organizer to help you analyze the Battle of Yorktown in greater detail.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulatives

Advanced Fire Simulator - Shodor:

In this online activity, students burn a simulated forest and adjust the probability that the fire spreads from one tree to the other. This simulation also records data for each trial including the burn probability, where the fire started, the percent of trees burned, and how long the fire lasted. This activity allows students to explore the idea of chaos in a simulation of a realistic scenario. Supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet are linked to the applet.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Box Plot:

In this activity, students use preset data or enter in their own data to be represented in a box plot. This activity allows students to explore single as well as side-by-side box plots of different data. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the Java applet.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Normal Distribution Interactive Activity:

With this online tool, students adjust the standard deviation and sample size of a normal distribution to see how it will affect a histogram of that distribution. This activity allows students to explore the effect of changing the sample size in an experiment and the effect of changing the standard deviation of a normal distribution. Tabs at the top of the page provide access to supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Advanced Data Grapher:

This is an online graphing utility that can be used to create box plots, bubble graphs, scatterplots, histograms, and stem-and-leaf plots.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Histogram Tool:

This virtual manipulative histogram tool can aid in analyzing the distribution of a dataset. It has 6 preset datasets and a function to add your own data for analysis.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Multi Bar Graph:

This activity allows the user to graph data sets in multiple bar graphs. The color, thickness, and scale of the graph are adjustable which may produce graphs that are misleading. Users may input their own data, or use or alter pre-made data sets. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Histogram:

In this activity, students can create and view a histogram using existing data sets or original data entered. Students can adjust the interval size using a slider bar, and they can also adjust the other scales on the graph. This activity allows students to explore histograms as a way to represent data as well as the concepts of mean, standard deviation, and scale. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.