Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate United States Government (#2106800) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
SS.912.C.1.1: Evaluate, take, and defend positions on the founding ideals and principles in American Constitutional government.
SS.912.C.1.2: Explain how the Declaration of Independence reflected the political principles of popular sovereignty, social contract, natural rights, and individual rights.
SS.912.C.1.3: Evaluate the ideals and principles of the founding documents (Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Federalist Papers) that shaped American Democracy.
SS.912.C.1.4: Analyze and categorize the diverse viewpoints presented by the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists concerning ratification of the Constitution and inclusion of a bill of rights.
SS.912.C.1.5: Evaluate how the Constitution and its amendments reflect the political principles of rule of law, checks and balances, separation of powers, republicanism, democracy, and federalism.
SS.912.C.2.1: Evaluate the constitutional provisions establishing citizenship, and assess the criteria among citizens by birth, naturalized citizens, and non-citizens.
SS.912.C.2.2: Evaluate the importance of political participation and civic participation.
SS.912.C.2.3: Experience the responsibilities of citizens at the local, state, or federal levels.
Clarifications:
Examples are registering or pre-registering to vote, volunteering, communicating with government officials, informing others about current issues, participating in a political campaign/mock election.
SS.912.C.2.4: Evaluate, take, and defend positions on issues that cause the government to balance the interests of individuals with the public good.
SS.912.C.2.5: Conduct a service project to further the public good.
Clarifications:
Examples are school, community, state, national, international.
SS.912.C.2.6: Evaluate, take, and defend positions about rights protected by the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
SS.912.C.2.7: Explain why rights have limits and are not absolute.
Clarifications:
Examples are speech, search and seizure, religion, gun possession.
SS.912.C.2.8: Analyze the impact of citizen participation as a means of achieving political and social change.
Clarifications:
Examples are e-mail campaigns, boycotts, blogs, podcasts, protests, demonstrations, letters to editors.
SS.912.C.2.9: Identify the expansion of civil rights and liberties by examining the principles contained in primary documents.
Clarifications:
Examples are Preamble, Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Emancipation Proclamation, 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th Amendments, Voting Rights Act of 1965.
SS.912.C.2.10: Monitor current public issues in Florida.
Clarifications:
Examples are On-line Sunshine, media, e-mails to government officials, political text messaging.
SS.912.C.2.11: Analyze public policy solutions or courses of action to resolve a local, state, or federal issue.
SS.912.C.2.12: Explain the changing roles of television, radio, press, and Internet in political communication.
SS.912.C.2.13: Analyze various forms of political communication and evaluate for bias, factual accuracy, omission, and emotional appeal.
Clarifications:
Examples are political cartoons, propaganda, campaign advertisements, political speeches, electronic bumper stickers, blogs, media.
SS.912.C.2.14: Evaluate the processes and results of an election at the state or federal level.
SS.912.C.2.15: Evaluate the origins and roles of political parties, interest groups, media, and individuals in determining and shaping public policy.
SS.912.C.2.16: Analyze trends in voter turnout.
Clarifications:
Examples are youth voter turnout, issue-based voting.
SS.912.C.3.1: Examine the constitutional principles of representative government, limited government, consent of the governed, rule of law, and individual rights.
SS.912.C.3.2: Define federalism, and identify examples of the powers granted and denied to states and the national government in the American federal system of government.
SS.912.C.3.3: Analyze the structures, functions, and processes of the legislative branch as described in Article I of the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.4: Analyze the structures, functions, and processes of the executive branch as described in Article II of the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.5: Identify the impact of independent regulatory agencies in the federal bureaucracy.
Clarifications:
Examples are Federal Reserve, Food and Drug Administration, Federal Communications Commission.
SS.912.C.3.6: Analyze the structures, functions, and processes of the judicial branch as described in Article III of the Constitution.
SS.912.C.3.7: Describe the role of judicial review in American constitutional government.
SS.912.C.3.8: Compare the role of judges on the state and federal level with other elected officials.
Clarifications:
Examples are decisions based on the law vs. will of the majority.
SS.912.C.3.9: Analyze the various levels and responsibilities of courts in the federal and state judicial system and the relationships among them.
SS.912.C.3.10: Evaluate the significance and outcomes of landmark Supreme Court cases.
Clarifications:
Examples are Marbury v. Madison, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Gideon v. Wainwright, Miranda v. Arizona, Tinker v. Des Moines, Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, United States v. Nixon, Roe v. Wade, Bush v. Gore, Texas v. Johnson, Mapp v. Ohio, McCulloch v. Maryland, District of Columbia v. Heller.
SS.912.C.3.11: Contrast how the Constitution safeguards and limits individual rights.
SS.912.C.3.12: Simulate the judicial decision-making process in interpreting law at the state and federal level.
SS.912.C.3.13: Illustrate examples of how government affects the daily lives of citizens at the local, state, and national levels.
Clarifications:
Examples are education, transportation, crime prevention, funding of services.
SS.912.C.3.14: Examine constitutional powers (expressed, implied, concurrent, reserved).
SS.912.C.3.15: Examine how power and responsibility are distributed, shared, and limited by the Constitution.
SS.912.C.4.1: Explain how the world's nations are governed differently.
SS.912.C.4.2: Evaluate the influence of American foreign policy on other nations and the influences of other nations on American policies and society.
SS.912.C.4.3: Assess human rights policies of the United States and other countries.
SS.912.C.4.4: Compare indicators of democratization in multiple countries.
SS.912.G.4.1: Interpret population growth and other demographic data for any given place.
SS.912.G.5.5: Use geographic terms and tools to analyze case studies of policies and programs for resource use and management.
LAFS.910.RH.1.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
LAFS.910.RH.1.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
LAFS.910.RH.1.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
LAFS.910.RH.2.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
LAFS.910.RH.2.5: Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.
LAFS.910.RH.2.6: Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
LAFS.910.RH.3.7: Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
LAFS.910.RH.3.8: Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims.
LAFS.910.RH.3.9: Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
LAFS.910.RH.4.10: By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.910.SL.1.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
LAFS.910.SL.1.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
LAFS.910.SL.1.3: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
LAFS.910.SL.2.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
LAFS.910.WHST.1.1: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  1. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  2. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.
LAFS.910.WHST.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
LAFS.910.WHST.2.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.910.WHST.2.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS.910.WHST.2.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.9: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.910.WHST.4.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
MAFS.912.S-IC.2.3: Recognize the purposes of and differences among sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies; explain how randomization relates to each.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.912.S-IC.2.4: Use data from a sample survey to estimate a population mean or proportion; develop a margin of error through the use of simulation models for random sampling.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.912.S-IC.2.5: Use data from a randomized experiment to compare two treatments; use simulations to decide if differences between parameters are significant.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.912.S-IC.2.6: Evaluate reports based on data.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.912.S-ID.1.1: Represent data with plots on the real number line (dot plots, histograms, and box plots).
Clarifications:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.912.S-ID.1.2: Use statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to compare center (median, mean) and spread (interquartile range, standard deviation) of two or more different data sets.
Clarifications:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.912.S-ID.1.3: Interpret differences in shape, center, and spread in the context of the data sets, accounting for possible effects of extreme data points (outliers).
Clarifications:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.912.S-ID.1.4: Use the mean and standard deviation of a data set to fit it to a normal distribution and to estimate population percentages. Recognize that there are data sets for which such a procedure is not appropriate. Use calculators, spreadsheets, and tables to estimate areas under the normal curve.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.K12.MP.1.1:

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1:

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.5.1: Use appropriate tools strategically.

Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
MAFS.K12.MP.6.1:

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.912.C.2.4: Evaluate how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.
Clarifications:
Seat-belt enforcement, underage alcohol sales, reporting communicable diseases, child care, and AED availability.



General Course Information and Notes

VERSION DESCRIPTION

The purpose of this Pre-IB course is to prepare students for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (DP). As such, this course will provide academic rigor and relevance through a comprehensive curriculum based on the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and standards taught with reference to the unique facets of the IB. These facets include interrelatedness of subject areas, a holistic view of knowledge, intercultural awareness, embracing international issues, and communication as fundamental to learning. Instructional design must provide students with values and opportunities that enable them to develop respect for others and an appreciation of similarities and differences. Learning how to learn and how to critically evaluate information is as important as the content of the disciplines themselves.

 


GENERAL NOTES

Special Note. Pre-IB courses have been created by individual schools or school districts since before the MYP started. These courses mapped backwards the Diploma Programme (DP) to prepare students as early as age 14. The IB was never involved in creating or approving these courses. The IB acknowledges that it is important for students to receive preparation for taking part in the DP, and that preparation is the MYP. The IB designed the MYP to address the whole child, which, as a result, has a very different philosophical approach that aims at educating all students aged 11-16. Pre-IB courses usually deal with content, with less emphasis upon the needs of the whole child or the affective domain than the MYP. A school can have a course that it calls “pre-IB” as long as it makes it clear that the course and any supporting material have been developed independently of the IB. For this reason, the school must name the course along the lines of, for example, the “Any School pre-IB course”.

The IB does not recognize pre-IB courses or courses labeled IB by different school districts which are not an official part of the IBDP or IBCC curriculum. Typically, students enrolled in grade 9 or 10 are not in the IBDP or IBCC programmes.
https://ibanswers.ibo.org/app/answers/detail/a_id/5414/kw/pre-ib. Florida’s Pre-IB courses should only be used in schools where MYP is not offered in order to prepare students to enter the IBDP. Teachers of Florida’s Pre-IB courses should have undergone IB training in order to ensure seamless articulation for students within the subject area.
 
Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

Literacy Standards in Social Studies
Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/si.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 2106800 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Social Studies > SubSubject: Political Sciences >
Abbreviated Title: FL PRE-IB US GOVT
Number of Credits: Half credit (.5)
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
  • Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Required
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Core Academic Course Course Level: 3
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10
Graduation Requirement: United States Government



Educator Certifications

Political Science (Grades 6-12)
Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Social Science (Grades 6-12)


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