Humane Letters 4 History (#2109346) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
SS.912.A.1.1: Describe the importance of historiography, which includes how historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted, when interpreting events in history.
SS.912.A.1.2: Utilize a variety of primary and secondary sources to identify author, historical significance, audience, and authenticity to understand a historical period.
Clarifications:
Examples of primary and secondary sources may be found on various websites such as the site for The Kinsey Collection.
SS.912.A.1.3: Utilize timelines to identify the time sequence of historical data.
SS.912.A.1.4: Analyze how images, symbols, objects, cartoons, graphs, charts, maps, and artwork may be used to interpret the significance of time periods and events from the past.
SS.912.A.1.6: Use case studies to explore social, political, legal, and economic relationships in history.
SS.912.A.3.10: Review different economic and philosophic ideologies.
Clarifications:
Economic examples may include, but are not limited to, market economy, mixed economy, planned economy and philosophic examples are capitalism, socialism, communism, anarchy.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
SS.912.H.1.4: Explain philosophical beliefs as they relate to works in the arts.
Clarifications:
Examples are classical architecture, protest music, Native American dance, Japanese Noh.
SS.912.H.2.1: Identify specific characteristics of works within various art forms (architecture, dance, film, literature, music, theatre, and visual arts).
SS.912.H.2.3: Apply various types of critical analysis (contextual, formal, and intuitive criticism) to works in the arts, including the types and use of symbolism within art forms and their philosophical implications.
SS.912.H.2.4: Examine the effects that works in the arts have on groups, individuals, and cultures.
SS.912.H.3.1: Analyze the effects of transportation, trade, communication, science, and technology on the preservation and diffusion of culture.
SS.912.P.8.2: Discuss the relationship between language and thought.
SS.912.P.10.2: Identify how cultures change over time and vary within nations and internationally.
SS.912.P.10.3: Discuss the relationship between culture and conceptions of self and identity.
SS.912.S.2.1: Define the key components of a culture, such as knowledge, language and communication, customs, values, norms, and physical objects.
SS.912.S.2.9: Prepare original written and oral reports and presentations on specific events, people or historical eras.
SS.912.S.3.3: Examine and analyze various points of view relating to historical and current events.
SS.912.S.5.1: Identify basic social institutions and explain their impact on individuals, groups and organizations within society and how they transmit the values of society.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, familial, religious, educational, economic, and political institutions.
SS.912.S.5.6: Identify the factors that influence change in social norms over time.
SS.912.S.6.1: Describe how and why societies change over time.
SS.912.S.6.8: Investigate the consequences in society as result of changes.
SS.912.W.1.1: Use timelines to establish cause and effect relationships of historical events.
SS.912.W.1.2: Compare time measurement systems used by different cultures.
Clarifications:
Examples are Chinese, Gregorian, and Islamic calendars, dynastic periods, decade, century, era.
SS.912.W.1.3: Interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources.
Clarifications:
Examples are artifacts, images, auditory and written sources.
SS.912.W.1.4: Explain how historians use historical inquiry and other sciences to understand the past.
Clarifications:
Examples are archaeology, economics, geography, forensic chemistry, political science, physics.
SS.912.W.1.5: Compare conflicting interpretations or schools of thought about world events and individual contributions to history (historiography).
SS.912.W.1.6: Evaluate the role of history in shaping identity and character.
Clarifications:
Examples are ethnic, cultural, personal, national, religious.
SS.912.W.2.11: Describe the rise and achievements of significant rulers in medieval Europe.
Clarifications:
Examples are Charles Martel, Charlemagne, Otto the Great, William the Conqueror.
SS.912.W.2.12: Recognize the importance of Christian monasteries and convents as centers of education, charitable and missionary activity, economic productivity, and political power.
SS.912.W.2.13: Explain how Western civilization arose from a synthesis of classical Greco-Roman civilization, Judeo-Christian influence, and the cultures of northern European peoples promoting a cultural unity in Europe.
SS.912.W.2.17: Identify key figures, artistic, and intellectual achievements of the medieval period in Western Europe.
Clarifications:
Examples are Anselm of Canterbury, Chaucer, Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, Hildegard of Bingen, Dante, Code of Chivalry, Gothic architecture, illumination, universities, Natural Law Philosophy, Scholasticism.
SS.912.W.4.1: Identify the economic and political causes for the rise of the Italian city-states (Florence, Milan, Naples, Rome, Venice).
SS.912.W.4.5: Describe how ideas from the Middle Ages and Renaissance led to the Scientific Revolution.
SS.912.W.4.6: Describe how scientific theories and methods of the Scientific Revolution challenged those of the early classical and medieval periods.
SS.912.W.5.2: Identify major causes of the Enlightenment.
Clarifications:
Examples are ideas from the Renaissance, Scientific Revolution, Reformation, and resistance to absolutism.
SS.912.W.5.4: Evaluate the impact of Enlightenment ideals on the development of economic, political, and religious structures in the Western world.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.



General Course Information and Notes

VERSION DESCRIPTION

Humane Letters 4 - History is an integrated blending of History and Literature that centers on Western civilization from the Classical Roman world to Modernity. Emphasizing the classical approach to teaching and learning, this course fosters reading, discussion, and writing based on great works. This course is designed to be paired with Humane Letters 4 - Literature.

After three years of studying the linear and internal historical development of specific Western political entities (the United States; the several political units of Europe; ancient Greece, Rome, and Israel), Humane Letters 4—History takes a topical and comparative approach to all of these historical entities previously studied.  The course theme is diachronic and transnational innovation within an historical and intellectual tradition of continuity.  The selected texts present case studies in which innovative fusions occur between the concrete historical culture of an author and another text, author, or idea far removed in time and/or space.  Students will be guided towards the features of texts which cause them to be considered a part of the ‘great conversation,’ which is the history of the development of thought in Western civilization.  This development will be considered as both the cause of historical change and the effect of historical contingencies.  Recommended texts for this course include, but are not limited to: Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Aquinas’ Treatise on Law, Dante’s Inferno, Machiavelli’s Prince, the philosophy of Descartes, and The Brothers Karamazov (The recommended texts list entirely overlaps with Humane Letters 4—Literature, but the two complementary courses make use of these texts for different purposes).

Humane Letters 4 – History Learning Outcomes:

  •        Outline the mytho-historical parallels between Homer and the Aeneid; explain how Virgil fuses these elements to create a unique account of the origin and destiny of the Roman people.
  •        Identify the lines of Aquinas’ thought that are derived from the Christian and Augustinian tradition, and contrast these with Aristotelian innovations.
  •        Analyze how the spread and influence of the Latin language influenced Western civilization.
  •        Discuss how Dante fuses Christian monotheistic ideas into the form of epic poetry.
  •        Identify the ways in which contemporary politics inform Dante’s epic narrative techniques, and explain the ways in which this might have led to an historical evolution in the sense of European (Italian) identity.
  •        Describe the political influence of the church and its relation to secular sources of power which forms the cultural context of Machiavelli’s Prince; explain how this text marks a departure from the Constantinian fusion of church and state power.
  •        Contrast the authority of Descartes’ philosophical method with the traditional authorities of church and state; explain how Descartes may be considered a revolutionary turning point within modernity.
  •        Examine the conflict between religious thought and strains of modernist philosophy (rationalism, idealism, nihilism).

GENERAL NOTES

Instructional Practices

The recommended primary mode of instruction in Humane Letters is the seminar, supplemented with direct instruction through lecture or coaching. The seminar format requires that students participate actively in their search for the fullest understanding of the texts under examination. While the instructor serves as a guide in the learning process, the students and the instructor together investigate and explore the many complex ideas presented in the texts. Students are expected to follow these rules governing the seminar format:

  • Students must come to class having read the assignment in its entirety before they can participate in seminar discussion
  • Students must mentally prepare serious questions for the class to consider during discussion.
  • Each student must attend fully to the discussion at hand and refrain from carrying on side discussions.
  • Students must limit their comments only to the selection assigned for homework, or previously discussed passages.
  • Students must support their observations, arguments, or claims with specific textual evidence.

Literacy Standards in Social Studies
Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 2109346 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Social Studies > SubSubject: World and Eastern Hemispheric Histories >
Abbreviated Title: HUM LET 4 HISTORY
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Attributes:
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Elective Course Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 12
Graduation Requirement: Electives



Educator Certifications

Political Science (Grades 6-12)
History (Grades 6-12)
Social Science (Grades 6-12)


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