Humane Letters 3 Literature (#1005351) 


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org
You are not viewing the current course, please click the current year’s tab.

Course Standards

Name Description
ELA.11.C.1.2: Write complex narratives using appropriate techniques to establish multiple perspectives.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: See Writing Types and Narrative Techniques.
ELA.11.C.1.3: Write literary analyses to support claims, using logical reasoning, credible evidence from sources, and elaboration, demonstrating an understanding of literary elements.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: See Writing Types and Elaborative Techniques.
Clarification 2: Appropriate tone is expected to continue from 9th and 10th. Use narrative techniques to strengthen argument writing where appropriate.
Clarification 3: These written works will take longer and are meant to reflect thorough research and analysis.
ELA.11.C.1.4: Write an analysis of complex texts using logical organization and a tone and voice appropriate to the task and audience, demonstrating an understanding of the subject.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: See Writing Types.
ELA.11.C.1.5: Improve writing by considering feedback from adults, peers, and/or online editing tools, revising to improve clarity, structure, and style.
ELA.11.C.2.1: Present information orally, with a logical organization, coherent focus, and credible evidence, while employing effective rhetorical devices where appropriate.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: At this grade level, the emphasis is on the content, but students are still expected to follow earlier expectations: appropriate volume, pronunciation, and pacing. This benchmark introduces rhetorical devices to the benchmark, building on what students have learned in R.3.2 and giving them a chance to apply it.

Clarification 2: For further guidance, see the Secondary Oral Communication Rubric.

ELA.11.C.3.1: Follow the rules of standard English grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling appropriate to grade level.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Skills to be mastered at this grade level are as follows:
  • Use knowledge of usage rules to create flow in writing and presenting. 
Clarification 2: See Convention Progression by Grade Level for more information. 
ELA.11.C.4.1: Conduct literary research to answer a question, refining the scope of the question to align with interpretations of texts, and synthesizing information from primary and secondary sources.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: While the benchmark does require that students consult multiple sources, there is no requirement that they use every source they consult. Part of the skill in researching is discernment—being able to tell which information is relevant and which sources are trustworthy enough to include.
ELA.11.C.5.1: Create digital presentations to improve the experience of the audience.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: At this grade level, students are using multiple elements. The presentation may be delivered live or delivered as a stand-alone digital experience. The elements should be of different types. The elements should relate directly to the presentation and be incorporated in a way that engages the audience.
ELA.11.C.5.2: Create and export quality writing tailored to a specific audience, integrating multimedia elements, publishing to an online or LAN site.
ELA.11.R.1.1: Evaluate how key elements enhance or add layers of meaning and/or style in a literary text.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Key elements of a literary text are setting, plot, characterization, conflict, point of view, theme, and tone.
Clarification 2: For layers of meaning, any methodology or model may be used as long as students understand that text may have multiple layers and that authors use techniques to achieve those layers. A very workable model for looking at layers of meaning is that of I. A. Richards: 

Layer 1) the literal level, what the words actually mean
Layer 2) mood, those feelings that are evoked in the reader
Layer 3) tone, the author’s attitude
Layer 4) author’s purpose (interpretation of author’s purpose as it is often inferred)
Clarification 3: Style is the way in which the writer uses techniques for effect. It is distinct from meaning but can be used to make the author’s message more effective. The components of style are diction, syntax, grammar, and use of figurative language. Style helps to create the author’s voice.

ELA.11.R.1.2: Track and analyze universal themes in literary texts from different times and places.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: A universal theme is an idea that applies to anyone, anywhere, regardless of cultural differences. Examples include but are not limited to an individual’s or a community’s confrontation with nature; an individual’s struggle toward understanding, awareness, and/or spiritual enlightenment; the tension between the ideal and the real; the conflict between human beings and advancements in technology/science; the impact of the past on the present; the inevitability of fate; the struggle for equality; and the loss of innocence.
ELA.11.R.1.3: Analyze the author’s choices in using juxtaposition to define character perspective.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Juxtaposition is the technique of putting two or more elements side by side to invite comparison or contrast.

Clarification 2: The term perspective means “a particular attitude toward or way of regarding something.”

ELA.11.R.1.4: Analyze ways in which poetry reflects themes and issues of its time period.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Poetry for this benchmark should be selected from one of the following literary periods. 
  • Classical Period (1200 BCE–455 CE) 
  • Medieval Period (455 CE–1485 CE)  
  • Renaissance Period (130–1600) 
  • Restoration and 18th Century (1660–1790) British Literature  
  • Colonial and Early National Period (1600–1830) American Literature 
  • Romantic Period (1790–1870)  
  • Realism and Naturalism Period (1870–1930) 
  • Modernist Period (1910–1945)  
  • Contemporary Period (1945–present) 
Clarification 2: For more information, see Literary Periods
ELA.11.R.2.1: Evaluate the structure(s) and features in texts.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Students will evaluate the use of the following structures: description, problem/solution, chronological, compare and contrast, cause and effect, and sequence.

Clarification 2: Students will evaluate the use of the following features: table of contents, headings, captions, photographs, graphs, charts, illustrations, glossary, footnotes, annotations, and appendix.

ELA.11.R.2.2: Analyze the central idea(s) of speeches and essays from the Classical Period.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: See Rhetorical Appeals and Rhetorical Devices.
ELA.11.R.2.3: Analyze an author’s choices in establishing and achieving purpose(s) in speeches and essays from the Classical Period.
ELA.11.R.2.4: Compare the development of multiple arguments on the same topic, evaluating the effectiveness and validity of the claims, the authors’ reasoning, and the ways in which the authors use the same information to achieve different ends.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Validity refers to the soundness of the arguments.

Clarification 2: For more information on types of reasoning, see Types of Logical Reasoning.

ELA.11.R.3.1: Analyze the author’s use of figurative language and explain examples of allegory.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Examples of allegory should be taken from the following periods: 
  • Classical Period (1200 BCE–455 CE) 
  • Medieval Period (455 CE–1485 CE)  
  • Renaissance Period (1300–1600) 
  • Restoration and 18th Century (1660–1790) British Literature
  • Colonial and Early National Period (1600–1830) American Literature 
  • Romantic Period (1790–1870)
  • Realism and Naturalism Period (1870–1930)
  • Modernist Period (1910–1945) 
Clarification 2: Figurative language use that students will analyze are metaphor, simile, alliteration, onomatopoeia, personification, hyperbole, meiosis (understatement), allusion, and idiom. Other examples can be used in instruction.
Clarification 3: See Secondary Figurative Language
ELA.11.R.3.2: Paraphrase content from grade-level texts.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Most grade-level texts are appropriate for this benchmark.
ELA.11.R.3.3: Compare and contrast how contemporaneous authors address related topics, comparing the authors’ use of reasoning, and analyzing the texts within the context of the time period.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Contemporaneous authors here refers to authors who are contemporaries of each other writing within any of the following literary periods:
  • Classical Period (1200 BCE–455 CE)
  • Medieval Period (455 CE–1485 CE)
  • Renaissance Period (1300–1600)
  • Restoration and 18th Century (1660–1790) British Literature
  • Colonial and Early National Period (1600–1830) American Literature
  • Romantic Period (1790–1870)
  • Realism and Naturalism Period (1870–1930)
  • Modernist Period (1910–1945) 
Clarification 2: For more information on types of reasoning, see Types of Logical Reasoning. 
ELA.11.R.3.4: Evaluate an author’s use of rhetoric in text.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Students will evaluate the appropriateness of appeals and the effectiveness of devices. In this grade level, students are using and responsible for all four appeals; kairos is added at this grade level.

Clarification 2: Rhetorical devices for the purposes of this benchmark are the figurative language devices from 11.R.3.1 with the addition of irony, rhetorical question, antithesis, zeugma, metonymy, synecdoche, asyndeton, and chiasmus. 

Clarification 3: See Secondary Figurative Language.

Clarification 4: See Rhetorical Appeals and Rhetorical Devices.

ELA.11.V.1.1: Integrate academic vocabulary appropriate to grade level in speaking and writing.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: To integrate vocabulary, students will apply the vocabulary they have learned to authentic speaking and writing tasks independently. This use should be intentional, beyond responding to a prompt to use a word in a sentence.

Clarification 2: Academic vocabulary appropriate to grade level refers to words that are likely to appear across subject areas for the current grade level and beyond, vital to comprehension, critical for academic discussions and writing, and usually require explicit instruction.

ELA.11.V.1.2: Apply knowledge of etymology and derivations to determine meanings of words and phrases in grade-level content.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Etymology refers to the study of word origins and the ways that words have changed over time.

Clarification 2: Derivation refers to making new words from an existing word by adding affixes.

ELA.11.V.1.3: Apply knowledge of context clues, figurative language, word relationships, reference materials, and/or background knowledge to determine the connotative and denotative meaning of words and phrases, appropriate to grade level.
Clarifications:
Clarification 1: Review of words learned in this way is critical to building background knowledge and related vocabulary.

Clarification 2: See Context Clues and Word Relationships.

Clarification 3: See ELA.11.R.3.1 and Secondary Figurative Language.

ELA.K12.EE.1.1: Cite evidence to explain and justify reasoning.
Clarifications:
K-1 Students include textual evidence in their oral communication with guidance and support from adults. The evidence can consist of details from the text without naming the text. During 1st grade, students learn how to incorporate the evidence in their writing.

2-3 Students include relevant textual evidence in their written and oral communication. Students should name the text when they refer to it. In 3rd grade, students should use a combination of direct and indirect citations.

4-5 Students continue with previous skills and reference comments made by speakers and peers. Students cite texts that they’ve directly quoted, paraphrased, or used for information. When writing, students will use the form of citation dictated by the instructor or the style guide referenced by the instructor. 

6-8 Students continue with previous skills and use a style guide to create a proper citation.

9-12 Students continue with previous skills and should be aware of existing style guides and the ways in which they differ.

ELA.K12.EE.2.1: Read and comprehend grade-level complex texts proficiently.
Clarifications:
See Text Complexity for grade-level complexity bands and a text complexity rubric.
ELA.K12.EE.3.1: Make inferences to support comprehension.
Clarifications:
Students will make inferences before the words infer or inference are introduced. Kindergarten students will answer questions like “Why is the girl smiling?” or make predictions about what will happen based on the title page. Students will use the terms and apply them in 2nd grade and beyond.
ELA.K12.EE.4.1: Use appropriate collaborative techniques and active listening skills when engaging in discussions in a variety of situations.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten, students learn to listen to one another respectfully.

In grades 1-2, students build upon these skills by justifying what they are thinking. For example: “I think ________ because _______.” The collaborative conversations are becoming academic conversations.

In grades 3-12, students engage in academic conversations discussing claims and justifying their reasoning, refining and applying skills. Students build on ideas, propel the conversation, and support claims and counterclaims with evidence.

ELA.K12.EE.5.1: Use the accepted rules governing a specific format to create quality work.
Clarifications:
Students will incorporate skills learned into work products to produce quality work. For students to incorporate these skills appropriately, they must receive instruction. A 3rd grade student creating a poster board display must have instruction in how to effectively present information to do quality work.
ELA.K12.EE.6.1: Use appropriate voice and tone when speaking or writing.
Clarifications:
In kindergarten and 1st grade, students learn the difference between formal and informal language. For example, the way we talk to our friends differs from the way we speak to adults. In 2nd grade and beyond, students practice appropriate social and academic language to discuss texts.
MA.K12.MTR.1.1: Actively participate in effortful learning both individually and collectively.  

Mathematicians who participate in effortful learning both individually and with others: 

  • Analyze the problem in a way that makes sense given the task. 
  • Ask questions that will help with solving the task. 
  • Build perseverance by modifying methods as needed while solving a challenging task. 
  • Stay engaged and maintain a positive mindset when working to solve tasks. 
  • Help and support each other when attempting a new method or approach.

 

Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to participate actively in effortful learning both individually and with others:
  • Cultivate a community of growth mindset learners. 
  • Foster perseverance in students by choosing tasks that are challenging. 
  • Develop students’ ability to analyze and problem solve. 
  • Recognize students’ effort when solving challenging problems.
MA.K12.MTR.2.1: Demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways.  

Mathematicians who demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways:  

  • Build understanding through modeling and using manipulatives.
  • Represent solutions to problems in multiple ways using objects, drawings, tables, graphs and equations.
  • Progress from modeling problems with objects and drawings to using algorithms and equations.
  • Express connections between concepts and representations.
  • Choose a representation based on the given context or purpose.
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to demonstrate understanding by representing problems in multiple ways: 
  • Help students make connections between concepts and representations.
  • Provide opportunities for students to use manipulatives when investigating concepts.
  • Guide students from concrete to pictorial to abstract representations as understanding progresses.
  • Show students that various representations can have different purposes and can be useful in different situations. 
MA.K12.MTR.3.1: Complete tasks with mathematical fluency. 

Mathematicians who complete tasks with mathematical fluency:

  • Select efficient and appropriate methods for solving problems within the given context.
  • Maintain flexibility and accuracy while performing procedures and mental calculations.
  • Complete tasks accurately and with confidence.
  • Adapt procedures to apply them to a new context.
  • Use feedback to improve efficiency when performing calculations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to complete tasks with mathematical fluency:
  • Provide students with the flexibility to solve problems by selecting a procedure that allows them to solve efficiently and accurately.
  • Offer multiple opportunities for students to practice efficient and generalizable methods.
  • Provide opportunities for students to reflect on the method they used and determine if a more efficient method could have been used. 
MA.K12.MTR.4.1: Engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others. 

Mathematicians who engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:

  • Communicate mathematical ideas, vocabulary and methods effectively.
  • Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.
  • Compare the efficiency of a method to those expressed by others.
  • Recognize errors and suggest how to correctly solve the task.
  • Justify results by explaining methods and processes.
  • Construct possible arguments based on evidence. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to engage in discussions that reflect on the mathematical thinking of self and others:
  • Establish a culture in which students ask questions of the teacher and their peers, and error is an opportunity for learning.
  • Create opportunities for students to discuss their thinking with peers.
  • Select, sequence and present student work to advance and deepen understanding of correct and increasingly efficient methods.
  • Develop students’ ability to justify methods and compare their responses to the responses of their peers. 
MA.K12.MTR.5.1: Use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts. 

Mathematicians who use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:

  • Focus on relevant details within a problem.
  • Create plans and procedures to logically order events, steps or ideas to solve problems.
  • Decompose a complex problem into manageable parts.
  • Relate previously learned concepts to new concepts.
  • Look for similarities among problems.
  • Connect solutions of problems to more complicated large-scale situations. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to use patterns and structure to help understand and connect mathematical concepts:
  • Help students recognize the patterns in the world around them and connect these patterns to mathematical concepts.
  • Support students to develop generalizations based on the similarities found among problems.
  • Provide opportunities for students to create plans and procedures to solve problems.
  • Develop students’ ability to construct relationships between their current understanding and more sophisticated ways of thinking.
MA.K12.MTR.6.1: Assess the reasonableness of solutions. 

Mathematicians who assess the reasonableness of solutions: 

  • Estimate to discover possible solutions.
  • Use benchmark quantities to determine if a solution makes sense.
  • Check calculations when solving problems.
  • Verify possible solutions by explaining the methods used.
  • Evaluate results based on the given context. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to assess the reasonableness of solutions:
  • Have students estimate or predict solutions prior to solving.
  • Prompt students to continually ask, “Does this solution make sense? How do you know?”
  • Reinforce that students check their work as they progress within and after a task.
  • Strengthen students’ ability to verify solutions through justifications. 
MA.K12.MTR.7.1: Apply mathematics to real-world contexts. 

Mathematicians who apply mathematics to real-world contexts:

  • Connect mathematical concepts to everyday experiences.
  • Use models and methods to understand, represent and solve problems.
  • Perform investigations to gather data or determine if a method is appropriate. • Redesign models and methods to improve accuracy or efficiency. 
Clarifications:
Teachers who encourage students to apply mathematics to real-world contexts:
  • Provide opportunities for students to create models, both concrete and abstract, and perform investigations.
  • Challenge students to question the accuracy of their models and methods.
  • Support students as they validate conclusions by comparing them to the given situation.
  • Indicate how various concepts can be applied to other disciplines.
ELD.K12.ELL.LA.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
HE.912.B.4.1: Explain skills needed to communicate effectively with family, peers, and others to enhance health.
Clarifications:
Using "I" messages, voice pitch/volume, eye contact, journal experiences, writing letters, persuasive speech, and assertive communication.
HE.912.B.4.2: Assess refusal, negotiation, and collaboration skills to enhance health and avoid or reduce health risks.
Clarifications:
Validate other’s opinions, use direct statement, use active statement, and offer alternatives.
SS.912.C.1.3: Evaluate the ideals and principles of the founding documents (Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Federalist Papers) that shaped American Democracy.
SS.912.C.2.9: Identify the expansion of civil rights and liberties by examining the principles contained in primary documents.
Clarifications:
Examples are Preamble, Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Emancipation Proclamation, 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th Amendments, Voting Rights Act of 1965.



General Course Information and Notes

VERSION DESCRIPTION

This course defines what students should understand and be able to do by the end of 11th grade. Knowledge acquisition should be the primary purpose of any reading approach as the systematic building of a wide range of knowledge across domains is a prerequisite to higher literacy. At this grade level, students are working with universal themes and archetypes. They are also continuing to build their facility with rhetoric, the craft of using language in writing and speaking, using classic literature, essays, and speeches as mentor texts.

This course is designed to be paired with Humane Letters 3 – History. Emphasizing the classical approach to teaching and learning, this course is devoted to reading, discussing, and writing based on ideas contained within the great books of the ancient Greek traditions. In this course students strive to better understand the world around them by thinking critically about the deeds, positions, and disputes of those who came before us. Through careful reading, thoughtful discussion, and persuasive writing, students will sharpen their abilities to think analytically and critically. This course draws frequently upon the literary aspects of the texts recommended in Humane Letters 3—History.  Additional recommended texts for this course include, but are not limited to: OdysseyEuthyphro, Meno, Republic, Nicomachean Ethics.

The benchmarks in this course are mastery goals that students are expected to attain by the end of the year. To build mastery, students will continue to review and apply earlier grade-level benchmarks and expectations.


GENERAL NOTES

The Humane Letters course focuses on the great literature and texts of the American canon with special attention to the historical progression of the United States from its founding to the present. The course explores the ideas, principles, and stories that have shaped this nation into a modern republic and how these ideas are reflected in representative literature and primary source texts. Through careful reading, thoughtful discussion, and persuasive writing, students will sharpen their abilities to think analytically and critically. The curriculum acquaints students with the American tradition and encourages them to search for truthful conclusions concerning the critical questions and ideas raised during class discussions.

The primary mode of instruction in Humane Letters is the seminar, which is supplemented with direct instruction through lecture or coaching. The seminar format requires that students participate actively in their search for the fullest understanding of the texts under examination. While the instructor serves as a guide in this project, the students and the instructor together investigate and explore the many complex ideas presented in the texts.

The content should include readings from classic American literature and selected primary source documents, but not be limited to, the following:

  • active reading of varied texts for what they say explicitly, as well as the logical inferences that can be drawn
  • analysis of literature and informational texts from varied literary periods to examine:
    • text craft and structure
    • elements of literature
    • arguments and claims supported by textual evidence
    • power and impact of language
    • influence of history, culture, and setting on language
    • personal critical and aesthetic response
  • writing for varied purposes
    • developing and supporting argumentative claims
    • crafting coherent, supported informative/expository texts
    • responding to literature for personal and analytical purposes
    • writing narratives to develop real or imagined events
    • writing to sources using text- based evidence and reasoning
  • effective listening, speaking, and viewing strategies with emphasis on the use of evidence to support or refute a claim in multimedia presentations, class discussions, and extended text discussions
  • collaboration amongst peers

Literacy Standards in Social Studies:

Secondary social studies courses include reading standards for literacy in history/social studies 6-12, and writing standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects 6-12. This course also includes speaking and listening standards. For a complete list of standards required for this course click on the blue tile labeled course standards. You may also download the complete course including all required standards and notes sections using the export function located at the top of this page.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: SS.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 1005351 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: English/Language Arts > SubSubject: Literature >
Abbreviated Title: HUMANE LETTERS 3
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Core Academic Course Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 11
Graduation Requirement: English



Educator Certifications

English (Grades 6-12)
Middle Grades English (Middle Grades 5-9)


There are more than 728 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/22116