Access Chemistry 1 (#7920011) 

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Course Standards

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SC.912.L.18.12: Discuss the special properties of water that contribute to Earth's suitability as an environment for life: cohesive behavior, ability to moderate temperature, expansion upon freezing, and versatility as a solvent.
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SC.912.L.18.In.7: Identify that special properties of water, such as the ability to moderate temperature and dissolve substances, help to sustain living things on Earth.
SC.912.L.18.Su.6: Identify the important role of water in sustaining life of plants and animals.
SC.912.L.18.Pa.5: Recognize that plants and animals use water to live.

SC.912.N.1.1: Define a problem based on a specific  body of knowledge, for example: biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science, and do the following: 
  1. Pose questions about the natural world, (Articulate the purpose of the investigation and identify the relevant scientific concepts).
  2. Conduct systematic observations, (Write procedures that are clear and replicable. Identify observables and examine relationships between test (independent) variable and outcome (dependent) variable. Employ appropriate methods for accurate and consistent observations; conduct and record measurements at appropriate levels of precision. Follow safety guidelines).
  3. Examine books and other sources of information to see what is already known,
  4. Review what is known in light of empirical evidence, (Examine whether available empirical evidence can be interpreted in terms of existing knowledge and models, and if not, modify or develop new models).
  5. Plan investigations, (Design and evaluate a scientific investigation).
  6. Use tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data (this includes the use of measurement in metric and other systems, and also the generation and interpretation of graphical representations of data, including data tables and graphs), (Collect data or evidence in an organized way. Properly use instruments, equipment, and materials (e.g., scales, probeware, meter sticks, microscopes, computers) including set-up, calibration, technique, maintenance, and storage).
  7. Pose answers, explanations, or descriptions of events,
  8. Generate explanations that explicate or describe natural phenomena (inferences),
  9. Use appropriate evidence and reasoning to justify these explanations to others,
  10. Communicate results of scientific investigations, and
  11. Evaluate the merits of the explanations produced by others.
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SC.912.N.1.In.1: Identify a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Identify a scientific question 2. Examine reliable sources of informtion to identify what is already known 3. Develop a possible explanation (hypothesis) 4. Plan and carry out an experiment 5. Gather data based on measurement and observations 6. Evaluate the data 7. Use the data to support reasonable explanations, inferences, and conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.1: Recognize a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Recognize a scientific question 2. Use reliable information and identify what is already known 3. Create possible explanation 4. Carry out a planned experiment 5. Record observations 6. Summarize results 7. Reach a reasonable conclusion.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.1: Recognize a problem related to a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Observe objects and activities 2. Follow planned procedures 3. Recognize a solution.

SC.912.N.1.2: Describe and explain what characterizes science and its methods.
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SC.912.N.1.In.2: Describe the processes used in scientific investigations, including posing a research question, forming a hypothesis, reviewing what is known, collecting evidence, evaluating results, and reaching conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.2: Identify the basic process used in scientific investigations, including questioning, observing, recording, determining, and sharing results.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.2: Recognize a process used in science to solve problems, such as observing, following procedures, and recognizing results.

SC.912.N.1.4: Identify sources of information and assess their reliability according to the strict standards of scientific investigation.
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SC.912.N.1.In.1: Identify a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Identify a scientific question 2. Examine reliable sources of informtion to identify what is already known 3. Develop a possible explanation (hypothesis) 4. Plan and carry out an experiment 5. Gather data based on measurement and observations 6. Evaluate the data 7. Use the data to support reasonable explanations, inferences, and conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.1: Recognize a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Recognize a scientific question 2. Use reliable information and identify what is already known 3. Create possible explanation 4. Carry out a planned experiment 5. Record observations 6. Summarize results 7. Reach a reasonable conclusion.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.1: Recognize a problem related to a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Observe objects and activities 2. Follow planned procedures 3. Recognize a solution.

SC.912.N.1.5: Describe and provide examples of how similar investigations conducted in many parts of the world result in the same outcome.
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SC.912.N.1.In.3: Identify that scientific investigations are sometimes repeated in different locations.
SC.912.N.1.Su.3: Recognize that scientific investigations can be repeated in different locations.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.3: Recognize that when a variety of common activities are repeated the same way, the outcomes are the same.

SC.912.N.1.6: Describe how scientific inferences are drawn from scientific observations and provide examples from the content being studied.
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SC.912.N.1.In.1: Identify a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Identify a scientific question 2. Examine reliable sources of informtion to identify what is already known 3. Develop a possible explanation (hypothesis) 4. Plan and carry out an experiment 5. Gather data based on measurement and observations 6. Evaluate the data 7. Use the data to support reasonable explanations, inferences, and conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.1: Recognize a problem based on a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Recognize a scientific question 2. Use reliable information and identify what is already known 3. Create possible explanation 4. Carry out a planned experiment 5. Record observations 6. Summarize results 7. Reach a reasonable conclusion.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.1: Recognize a problem related to a specific body of knowledge, including life science, earth and space science, or physical science, and do the following: 1. Observe objects and activities 2. Follow planned procedures 3. Recognize a solution.

SC.912.N.1.7: Recognize the role of creativity in constructing scientific questions, methods and explanations.
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SC.912.N.1.In.4: Identify that scientists use many different methods in conducting their research.
SC.912.N.1.Su.4: Recognize that scientists use a variety of methods to get answers to their research questions.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.4: Recognize that people try different ways to complete a task when the first one does not work.

SC.912.N.2.2: Identify which questions can be answered through science and which questions are outside the boundaries of scientific investigation, such as questions addressed by other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, and religion.
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SC.912.N.2.In.2: Distinguish between questions that can be answered by science and observable information and questions that can’t be answered by science and observable information.
SC.912.N.2.Su.1: Identify questions that can be answered by science.
SC.912.N.2.Pa.1: Recognize an example of work by scientists.

SC.912.N.2.4: Explain that scientific knowledge is both durable and robust and open to change. Scientific knowledge can change because it is often examined and re-examined by new investigations and scientific argumentation. Because of these frequent examinations, scientific knowledge becomes stronger, leading to its durability.
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SC.912.N.2.In.3: Recognize that scientific knowledge can be challenged or confirmed by new investigations and reexamination.
SC.912.N.2.Su.2: Recognize that what is known about science can change based on new information.
SC.912.N.2.Pa.2: Recognize a variety of cause-effect relationships related to science.

SC.912.N.2.5: Describe instances in which scientists' varied backgrounds, talents, interests, and goals influence the inferences and thus the explanations that they make about observations of natural phenomena and describe that competing interpretations (explanations) of scientists are a strength of science as they are a source of new, testable ideas that have the potential to add new evidence to support one or another of the explanations.
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SC.912.N.2.In.4: Identify major contributions of scientists.
SC.912.N.2.Su.3: Recognize major contributions of scientists.
SC.912.N.2.Pa.1: Recognize an example of work by scientists.

SC.912.N.3.2: Describe the role consensus plays in the historical development of a theory in any one of the disciplines of science.
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SC.912.N.3.In.1: Recognize that a scientific theory is developed by repeated investigations of many scientists and agreement on the likely explanation.
SC.912.N.3.Su.1: Recognize that scientific theories are supported by evidence and agreement of many scientists.
SC.912.N.3.Pa.1: Recognize examples of cause-effect descriptions or explanations related to science.

SC.912.N.3.3: Explain that scientific laws are descriptions of specific relationships under given conditions in nature, but do not offer explanations for those relationships.
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SC.912.N.3.In.2: Identify examples of scientific laws that describe relationships in the natural world, such as Newton’s laws.
SC.912.N.3.Su.2: Recognize examples of scientific laws that describe relationships in nature, such as Newton’s laws.
SC.912.N.3.Pa.1: Recognize examples of cause-effect descriptions or explanations related to science.

SC.912.N.3.5: Describe the function of models in science, and identify the wide range of models used in science.
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SC.912.N.3.In.3: Identify ways models are used in the study of science.
SC.912.N.3.Su.3: Recognize ways models are used in the study of science.
SC.912.N.3.Pa.2: Recognize a model used in the context of one’s own study of science.

SC.912.N.4.1: Explain how scientific knowledge and reasoning provide an empirically-based perspective to inform society's decision making.
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SC.912.N.4.In.1: Identify ways scientific knowledge and problem solving benefit people.
SC.912.N.4.Su.1: Recognize ways scientific knowledge and problem solving benefit people.
SC.912.N.4.Pa.1: Recognize science information that helps people.

SC.912.P.8.1: Differentiate among the four states of matter.
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SC.912.P.8.In.1: Classify states of matter as solid, liquid, and gaseous.
SC.912.P.8.Su.1: Identify examples of states of matter as solid, liquid, and gaseous.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.1: Select an example of a common solid, liquid, and gas.

SC.912.P.8.2: Differentiate between physical and chemical properties and physical and chemical changes of matter.
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SC.912.P.8.In.2: Compare characteristics of physical and chemical changes of matter.
SC.912.P.8.Su.2: Identify examples of physical and chemical changes.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.2: Recognize a common chemical change, such as cooking, burning, rusting, or decaying.

SC.912.P.8.3: Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by describing changes in the atomic model over time and why those changes were necessitated by experimental evidence.
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SC.912.P.8.In.3: Identify the nucleus as the center of an atom.
SC.912.P.8.Su.3: Recognize that atoms are tiny particles in materials, too small to see.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.3: Recognize that the parts of an object can be put together to make a whole.

SC.912.P.8.4: Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by describing the structure of atoms in terms of protons, neutrons and electrons, and differentiate among these particles in terms of their mass, electrical charges and locations within the atom.
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SC.912.P.8.In.3: Identify the nucleus as the center of an atom.
SC.912.P.8.Su.3: Recognize that atoms are tiny particles in materials, too small to see.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.3: Recognize that the parts of an object can be put together to make a whole.

SC.912.P.8.5: Relate properties of atoms and their position in the periodic table to the arrangement of their electrons.
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SC.912.P.8.In.4: Recognize that the periodic table includes all known elements.
SC.912.P.8.Su.4: Recognize examples of common elements, such as oxygen and hydrogen.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.4: Recognize that the parts of an object can be put together to make a whole.

SC.912.P.8.6: Distinguish between bonding forces holding compounds together and other attractive forces, including hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces.
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SC.912.P.8.In.5: Identify that compounds are made of two or more elements.
SC.912.P.8.Su.5: Recognize examples of common compounds, such as water and salt.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.5: Match common compounds to their names or communication symbols.

SC.912.P.8.7: Interpret formula representations of molecules and compounds in terms of composition and structure.
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SC.912.P.8.In.6: Identify formulas for common compounds, such as H2O and CO2.
SC.912.P.8.Su.6: Match common chemical formulas to their common name, such as H2O to water.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.5: Match common compounds to their names or communication symbols.

SC.912.P.8.8: Characterize types of chemical reactions, for example: redox, acid-base, synthesis, and single and double replacement reactions.
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SC.912.P.8.In.2: Compare characteristics of physical and chemical changes of matter.
SC.912.P.8.Su.2: Identify examples of physical and chemical changes.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.2: Recognize a common chemical change, such as cooking, burning, rusting, or decaying.

SC.912.P.8.9: Apply the mole concept and the law of conservation of mass to calculate quantities of chemicals participating in reactions.
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SC.912.P.8.In.2: Compare characteristics of physical and chemical changes of matter.
SC.912.P.8.Su.2: Identify examples of physical and chemical changes.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.2: Recognize a common chemical change, such as cooking, burning, rusting, or decaying.

SC.912.P.8.11: Relate acidity and basicity to hydronium and hydroxyl ion concentration and pH.
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SC.912.P.8.In.7: Identify properties of common acids and bases.
SC.912.P.8.Su.7: Categorize common materials or foods as acids or bases.
SC.912.P.8.Pa.6: Recognize that some acids and bases can be dangerous and identify related hazard symbols.

SC.912.P.10.1: Differentiate among the various forms of energy and recognize that they can be transformed from one form to others.
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SC.912.P.10.In.1: Identify examples of energy being transformed from one form to another (conserved quantity).
SC.912.P.10.Su.1: Recognize energy transformations that occur in everyday life, such as solar energy to electricity.
SC.912.P.10.Pa.1: Observe and recognize examples of the transformation of electrical energy to light and heat.

SC.912.P.10.5: Relate temperature to the average molecular kinetic energy.
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SC.912.P.10.In.3: Relate the transfer of heat to the states of matter, including gases result from heating, liquids result from cooling a gas, and solids result from further cooling a liquid.
SC.912.P.10.Su.3: Observe and recognize ways that heat travels, such as through space (radiation), through solids (conduction), and through liquids and gases (convection).
SC.912.P.10.Pa.3: Recognize the source and recipient of heat transfer.

SC.912.P.10.6: Create and interpret potential energy diagrams, for example: chemical reactions, orbits around a central body, motion of a pendulum.
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SC.912.P.10.In.1: Identify examples of energy being transformed from one form to another (conserved quantity).
SC.912.P.10.Su.1: Recognize energy transformations that occur in everyday life, such as solar energy to electricity.
SC.912.P.10.Pa.4: Identify materials that provide protection (insulation) from heat.

SC.912.P.10.7: Distinguish between endothermic and exothermic chemical processes.
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SC.912.P.10.In.4: Describe a process that gives off heat (exothermic), such as burning, and a process that absorbs heat (endothermic), such as water coming to a boil.
SC.912.P.10.Su.4: Recognize common processes that give off heat (exothermic), such as burning, and processes that absorb heat (endothermic), such as water coming to a boil.
SC.912.P.10.Pa.4: Identify materials that provide protection (insulation) from heat.

SC.912.P.10.9: Describe the quantization of energy at the atomic level.
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SC.912.P.10.In.6: Identify that atoms can be changed to release energy, such as in nuclear power plants, and recognize one related safety issue.
SC.912.P.10.Su.5: Recognize that nuclear power plants generate electricity and can be dangerous.
SC.912.P.10.Pa.5: Recognize the universal symbols for radioactive and other hazardous materials.

SC.912.P.10.12: Differentiate between chemical and nuclear reactions.
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SC.912.P.10.In.6: Identify that atoms can be changed to release energy, such as in nuclear power plants, and recognize one related safety issue.
SC.912.P.10.Su.5: Recognize that nuclear power plants generate electricity and can be dangerous.
SC.912.P.10.Pa.5: Recognize the universal symbols for radioactive and other hazardous materials.

SC.912.P.10.18: Explore the theory of electromagnetism by comparing and contrasting the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum in terms of wavelength, frequency, and energy, and relate them to phenomena and applications.
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SC.912.P.10.In.9: Identify common applications of electromagnetic waves moving through different media, such as radio waves, microwaves, x-rays, or infrared.
SC.912.P.10.Su.10: Recognize examples of electromagnetic waves moving through different media, such as microwave ovens, radios, and x-rays.
SC.912.P.10.Pa.10: Recognize primary and secondary colors in visible light.

SC.912.P.12.10: Interpret the behavior of ideal gases in terms of kinetic molecular theory.
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SC.912.P.12.In.6: Identify that gases exert pressure in a closed surface, such as pressure inside a basketball or a hot air balloon.
SC.912.P.12.Su.6: Recognize that a gas can exert pressure, such as in balloons, car tires, or pool floats.
SC.912.P.12.Pa.6: Recognize that some objects contain air, such as balloons, tires, and balls.

SC.912.P.12.11: Describe phase transitions in terms of kinetic molecular theory.
SC.912.P.12.12: Explain how various factors, such as concentration, temperature, and presence of a catalyst affect the rate of a chemical reaction.
SC.912.P.12.13: Explain the concept of dynamic equilibrium in terms of reversible processes occurring at the same rates.
LAFS.1112.RST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.
LAFS.1112.RST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.
LAFS.1112.RST.1.3 (Archived Standard): Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text.
LAFS.1112.RST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.
LAFS.1112.RST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Analyze how the text structures information or ideas into categories or hierarchies, demonstrating understanding of the information or ideas.
LAFS.1112.RST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, identifying important issues that remain unresolved.
LAFS.1112.RST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
LAFS.1112.RST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.
LAFS.1112.RST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.
LAFS.1112.RST.4.10 (Archived Standard): By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 11–12 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.1 (Archived Standard): Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
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LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1b: Clarify, verify or challenge ideas and conclusions within a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1c: Summarize points of agreement and disagreement within a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1d: Use evidence and reasoning presented in discussion on topic or text to make new connections with own view or understanding.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1e: Work with peers to promote democratic discussions.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1f: Actively seek the ideas or opinions of others in a discussion on a given topic or text.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.1g: Engage appropriately in discussion with others who have a diverse or divergent perspectives.

LAFS.1112.SL.1.2 (Archived Standard): Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
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LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.2a: Analyze credibility of sources and accuracy of information presented in social media regarding a given topic or text.

LAFS.1112.SL.1.3 (Archived Standard): Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
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LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.3a: Determine the speaker’s point of view or purpose in a text.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.3b: Determine what arguments the speaker makes.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.3c: Evaluate the evidence used to make the speaker’s argument.
LAFS.1112.SL.1.AP.3d: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, use of evidence and rhetoric for ideas, relationship between claims, reasoning, evidence and word choice.

LAFS.1112.SL.2.4 (Archived Standard): Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.
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LAFS.1112.SL.2.AP.4a: Report orally on a topic, with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details that support the main ideas.

LAFS.1112.SL.2.5 (Archived Standard): Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
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LAFS.1112.SL.2.AP.5a: Include digital multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.

LAFS.1112.WHST.1.1 (Archived Standard): Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  1. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  2. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.
LAFS.1112.WHST.1.2 (Archived Standard): Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.4 (Archived Standard): Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.5 (Archived Standard): Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS.1112.WHST.2.6 (Archived Standard): Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.7 (Archived Standard): Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.8 (Archived Standard): Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9 (Archived Standard): Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.1112.WHST.4.10 (Archived Standard): Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
MAFS.912.F-IF.2.4 (Archived Standard): For a function that models a relationship between two quantities, interpret key features of graphs and tables in terms of the quantities, and sketch graphs showing key features given a verbal description of the relationship. Key features include: intercepts; intervals where the function is increasing, decreasing, positive, or negative; relative maximums and minimums; symmetries; end behavior; and periodicity.
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MAFS.912.F-IF.2.AP.4a: Recognize and interpret the key features of a function.
MAFS.912.F-IF.2.AP.4b: Select the graph that matches the description of the relationship between two quantities in the function.

MAFS.912.F-IF.3.7 (Archived Standard): Graph functions expressed symbolically and show key features of the graph, by hand in simple cases and using technology for more complicated cases.

  1. Graph linear and quadratic functions and show intercepts, maxima, and minima.
  2. Graph square root, cube root, and piecewise-defined functions, including step functions and absolute value functions.
  3. Graph polynomial functions, identifying zeros when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior. 
  4. Graph rational functions, identifying zeros and asymptotes when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior. 
  5. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions, showing intercepts and end behavior, and trigonometric functions, showing period, midline, and amplitude, and using phase shift.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.F-IF.3.AP.7a: Select a graph of a function that displays its symbolic representation (e.g., f(x) = 3x + 5).
MAFS.912.F-IF.3.AP.7b: Locate the key features of linear and quadratic equations.

MAFS.912.N-Q.1.1 (Archived Standard): Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.1a: Interpret units in the context of the problem.
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.1b: When solving a multi-step problem, use units to evaluate the appropriateness of the solution.
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.1c: Choose the appropriate units for a specific formula and interpret the meaning of the unit in that context.
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.1d: Choose and interpret both the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

MAFS.912.N-Q.1.3 (Archived Standard): Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.N-Q.1.AP.3a: Describe the accuracy of measurement when reporting quantities (you can lessen your limitations by measuring precisely).

MAFS.912.S-ID.1.1 (Archived Standard): Represent data with plots on the real number line (dot plots, histograms, and box plots).
Clarifications:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.S-ID.1.AP.1a: Complete a graph given the data, using dot plots, histograms or box plots.

MAFS.912.S-ID.1.2 (Archived Standard): Use statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to compare center (median, mean) and spread (interquartile range, standard deviation) of two or more different data sets.
Clarifications:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.S-ID.1.AP.2a: Describe a distribution using center and spread
MAFS.912.S-ID.1.AP.2b: Use the correct measure of center and spread to describe a distribution that is symmetric or skewed.
MAFS.912.S-ID.1.AP.2c: Identify outliers (extreme data points) and their effects on data sets.
MAFS.912.S-ID.1.AP.2d: Compare two or more different data sets using the center and spread of each.

MAFS.912.S-ID.1.3 (Archived Standard): Interpret differences in shape, center, and spread in the context of the data sets, accounting for possible effects of extreme data points (outliers).
Clarifications:
In grades 6 – 8, students describe center and spread in a data distribution. Here they choose a summary statistic appropriate to the characteristics of the data distribution, such as the shape of the distribution or the existence of extreme data points.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.S-ID.1.AP.3a: Use statistical vocabulary to describe the difference in shape, spread, outliers and the center (mean).

MAFS.912.S-ID.1.4 (Archived Standard): Use the mean and standard deviation of a data set to fit it to a normal distribution and to estimate population percentages. Recognize that there are data sets for which such a procedure is not appropriate. Use calculators, spreadsheets, and tables to estimate areas under the normal curve.
MAFS.912.S-ID.2.5 (Archived Standard): Summarize categorical data for two categories in two-way frequency tables. Interpret relative frequencies in the context of the data (including joint, marginal, and conditional relative frequencies). Recognize possible associations and trends in the data.
Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.S-ID.2.AP.5a: Recognize associations and trends in data from a two-way table.

MAFS.912.S-ID.2.6 (Archived Standard): Represent data on two quantitative variables on a scatter plot, and describe how the variables are related.
  1. Fit a function to the data; use functions fitted to data to solve problems in the context of the data. Use given functions or choose a function suggested by the context. Emphasize linear, and exponential models.
  2. Informally assess the fit of a function by plotting and analyzing residuals.
  3. Fit a linear function for a scatter plot that suggests a linear association.

Clarifications:
Students take a more sophisticated look at using a linear function to model the relationship between two numerical variables. In addition to fitting a line to data, students assess how well the model fits by analyzing residuals.

Related Access Points
Name Description
MAFS.912.S-ID.2.AP.6a: Create a scatter plot from two quantitative variables.
MAFS.912.S-ID.2.AP.6b: Describe the form, strength, and direction of the relationship.
MAFS.912.S-ID.2.AP.6c: Categorize data as linear or not.
MAFS.912.S-ID.2.AP.6d: Use algebraic methods and technology to fit a linear function to the data.
MAFS.912.S-ID.2.AP.6e: Use the function to predict values.
MAFS.912.S-ID.2.AP.6f: Explain the meaning of the constant and coefficients in context.

ELD.K12.ELL.SC.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Science.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/sc.pdf.


VERSION REQUIREMENTS

Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).

Additional Instructional Resources:
A.V.E. for Success Collection:


General Information

Course Number: 7920011 Course Path: Section: Exceptional Student Education > Grade Group: Senior High and Adult > Subject: Academics - Subject Areas >
Abbreviated Title: ACCESS CHEMISTRY 1
Number of Credits: Course may be taken for up to two credits
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12,30,31
Graduation Requirement: Equally Rigorous Science



Educator Certifications

Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Chemistry (Grades 6-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Chemistry (Grades 6-12) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Science (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Chemistry (Grades 6-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9)
Chemistry (Grades 6-12) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Science (Secondary Grades 7-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Middle Grades General Science (Middle Grades 5-9) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Chemistry (Grades 6-12) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


There are more than 914 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/15513