Access Social Studies - Grade 5 (#7721016) 

{ Social Studies Grade 5 - 5021070 }


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Course Standards

Name Description
SS.5.A.1.1: Use primary and secondary sources to understand history.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, diaries, letters, newspapers, audio/video recordings, pictures, photographs, maps, graphs. Examples of all of these forms of primary sources may be found on various websites such as the site for The Kinsey Collection.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.1.In.a: Use primary and secondary resources to understand history, such as letters, newspapers, audio or video recordings, pictures, photographs, and maps.
SS.5.A.1.Su.a: Use primary and secondary resources related to history, such as letters, video recordings, photographs, pictures, and maps.
SS.5.A.1.Pa.a: Recognize artifacts, photographs, or video recordings related to people or events from the past.

SS.5.A.1.2: Utilize timelines to identify and discuss American History time periods.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.1.In.b: Complete a timeline to sequence important events in American history.
SS.5.A.1.Su.b: Sequence events to match dates on a timeline about American history.
SS.5.A.1.Pa.b: Sequence pictures that show events about America.

SS.5.A.2.1: Compare cultural aspects of ancient American civilizations (Aztecs/Mayas; Mound Builders/Anasazi/Inuit).
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, those listed in the benchmark.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.2.In.a: Identify differences in cultures in ancient North American civilizations, such as the buildings and clothing of Aztecs, Mayas, and Inuit.
SS.5.A.2.Su.a: Recognize a cultural aspect of an ancient North American civilization, such as buildings or clothing.
SS.5.A.2.Pa.a: Recognize differences in aspects of culture.

SS.5.A.2.2: Identify Native American tribes from different geographic regions of North America (cliff dwellers and Pueblo people of the desert Southwest, coastal tribes of the Pacific Northwest, nomadic nations of the Great Plains, woodland tribes east of the Mississippi River).
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, those listed in the benchmark.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.2.In.b: Recognize that Native American tribes lived in different parts of North America and had different customs.
SS.5.A.2.Su.b: Recognize that many different Native American tribes lived in North America.
SS.5.A.2.Pa.b: Recognize differences in Native American tribes.

SS.5.A.2.3: Compare cultural aspects of Native American tribes from different geographic regions of North America including but not limited to clothing, shelter, food, major beliefs and practices, music, art, and interactions with the environment.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.2.In.c: Identify differences in cultural aspects of Native American tribes, such as food, clothing, and shelters.
SS.5.A.2.Su.c: Recognize differences in cultural aspects of Native American tribes, such as food, clothing, and shelters.
SS.5.A.2.Pa.c: Recognize differences in Native American tribes.

SS.5.A.3.1: Describe technological developments that shaped European exploration.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to,  orienteering compass, sextant, astrolabe, seaworthy ships, and gunpowder.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.3.In.a: Recognize inventions that made exploration safer, such as the compass and seaworthy ships.
SS.5.A.3.Su.a: Recognize that exploration in ships was made safer with the compass.
SS.5.A.3.Pa.a: Recognize that tools make travel safe.

SS.5.A.3.2: Investigate (nationality, sponsoring country, motives, dates and routes of travel, accomplishments) the European explorers.
Clarifications:
In addition to those listed in the benchmark, examples may include, but are not limited to, Spanish, English, Dutch, Icelandic (Viking), and Swedish explorers.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.3.In.b: Identify a European explorer, the sponsoring country, and a reason for the exploration.
SS.5.A.3.Su.b: Recognize a reason why a European explorer came to America.
SS.5.A.3.Pa.b: Recognize that exploration involves looking for something new.

SS.5.A.3.3: Describe interactions among Native Americans, Africans, English, French, Dutch, and Spanish for control of North America.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, diseases,agriculture, slavery, fur trade, military alliances, treaties, cultural interchanges.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.3.In.c: Identify differences in interaction among Native Americans, Africans, English, French, Dutch, and Spanish for control of North America.
SS.5.A.3.Su.c: Recognize a difference in interaction among Native Americans, Africans, English, French, Dutch, and Spanish for control of North America.
SS.5.A.3.Pa.c: Recognize ways different groups interact with each other.

SS.5.A.4.1: Identify the economic, political and socio-cultural motivation for colonial settlement.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to,  Puritans, Quakers, and Catholics  fleeing from religious persecution, debtor settlements in Georgia, military stronghold and protection of trade routes at St. Augustine, establishment of the Jamestown colony for profit, and French and Dutch competition for the fur trade..
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.4.In.a: Identify reasons the colonists settled in America, such as to obtain land and religious freedom.
SS.5.A.4.Su.a: Recognize a reason why colonists settled in America, such as to obtain land.
SS.5.A.4.Pa.a: Recognize a reason why people move to a different place.

SS.5.A.4.2: Compare characteristics of New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, colonial governments, geographic influences, resources and economic systems, occupations, religion, education, and social patterns.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.4.In.b: Recognize differences in location and resources of the three groups of colonies (New England, Middle, and Southern).
SS.5.A.4.Su.b: Recognize resources found in a colonial region, such as farms in the Southern Colonies.
SS.5.A.4.Pa.b: Recognize that different regions had different resources.

SS.5.A.4.3: Identify significant individuals responsible for the development of the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, William Penn, Pontiac, Olaudah Equiano, George Whitefield, Roger Williams, John Winthrop, John Smith, John Rolfe, James Oglethorpe, Anne Hutchinson, Lord Baltimore.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.4.In.c: Recognize an individual responsible for development of new colonies, such as William Penn and Pennsylvania (Middle Colonies).
SS.5.A.4.Su.c: Recognize that leaders helped start new colonies.
SS.5.A.4.Pa.c: Recognize that different regions had different leaders.

SS.5.A.4.4: Demonstrate an understanding of political, economic, and social aspects of daily colonial life in the thirteen colonies.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, town meetings, farming, occupation, slavery, bartering, education, games, science, technology, transportation, religion.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.4.In.d: Identify various aspects of daily colonial life, such as farming, education, and games.
SS.5.A.4.Su.d: Recognize aspects of daily colonial life, such as farming and education.
SS.5.A.4.Pa.d: Recognize an aspect of colonial life, such as education.

SS.5.A.4.5: Explain the importance of Triangular Trade linking Africa, the West Indies, the British Colonies, and Europe.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.4.In.e: Recognize that Triangular Trade involved the exchange of goods for slaves with Africa, the West Indies, the British Colonies, and Europe.
SS.5.A.4.Su.e: Recognize that slaves were taken from Africa to work for others in the British Colonies.
SS.5.A.4.Pa.e: Recognize that slaves were forced to work for others.

SS.5.A.4.6: Describe the introduction, impact, and role of slavery in the colonies.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, cultural contributions, skilled labor, the move away from indentured servitude, growth of plantations, differences in treatment of slaves by region and assigned job (house slave v. field slave).
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.4.In.f: Identify that farmers in the Southern Colonies were able to have large farms because they owned the slaves that worked on them.
SS.5.A.4.Su.f: Recognize that farmers in the Southern Colonies had large farms with slaves.
SS.5.A.4.Pa.f: Recognize that slaves were forced to work for others.

SS.5.A.5.1: Identify and explain significant events leading up to the American Revolution.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, the Coercive Acts, the Powder Alarms.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.a: Identify events leading up to the American Revolution, such as unfair taxes and restriction of freedoms by the King of England.
SS.5.A.5.Su.a: Recognize an event that led to the American Revolution, such as unfair taxes.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.a: Recognize that the people who settled in America were unhappy with the King of England.

SS.5.A.5.2: Identify significant individuals and groups who played a role in the American Revolution.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, King George III, Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, John Adams, John Hancock, Crispus Attucks, Ben Franklin, Paul Revere and Patriots, Sons of Liberty, Daughters of Liberty, Continental Congress, James Armistead, Francis Marion. 
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.b: Recognize achievements of significant individuals from the American Revolution, such as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Ben Franklin.
SS.5.A.5.Su.b: Recognize a famous individual who contributed to the American Revolution, such as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, or Ben Franklin.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.b: Recognize George Washington.

SS.5.A.5.3: Explain the significance of historical documents including key political concepts, origins of these concepts, and their role in American independence.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, Common Sense, the Declaration of Independence.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.c: Identify that the Declaration of Independence stated that colonists wanted freedom from England.
SS.5.A.5.Su.c: Recognize that the colonists supported the Declaration of Independence.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.c: Recognize that the colonists wanted freedom from a king.

SS.5.A.5.4: Examine and explain the changing roles and impact of significant women during the American Revolution.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Abigail Adams, Martha Washington, Phyllis Wheatley, Mercy Otis Warren, Molly Pitcher, Deborah Sampson, Margaret Gage.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.d: Identify the role a woman played during the American Revolution, such as Martha Washington.
SS.5.A.5.Su.d: Recognize a famous woman from the American Revolution, such as Martha Washington.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.d: Recognize that women helped during the American Revolution.

SS.5.A.5.5: Examine and compare major battles and military campaigns of the American Revolution.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to,  Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, Valley Forge, Yorktown, Savannah, Charleston, Trenton, Princeton, Bunker Hill.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.e: Recognize a major battle in the American Revolution and a hardship the soldiers endured, such as winter at Valley Forge.
SS.5.A.5.Su.e: Recognize that George Washington led the troops against England during the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.e: Recognize that the colonists fought in the American Revolution.

SS.5.A.5.6: Identify the contributions of foreign alliances and individuals to the outcome of the Revolution.
Clarifications:
Examples my include, but are not limited to, France, Lafayette, Spain, de Galvez, von Stueben (aka de Steuben), Pulaski, Haiti.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.f: Recognize that France and other countries contributed money and supplies to help the colonists fight against England.
SS.5.A.5.Su.f: Recognize that the colonists needed help from other countries to win the Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.f: Recognize that other groups (countries) helped the colonists.

SS.5.A.5.7: Explain economic, military, and political factors which led to the end of the Revolutionary War.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, foreign alliances, rising cost for England, Treaty of Paris.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.g: Recognize that France and other countries contributed money and supplies to help the colonists fight against England.
SS.5.A.5.Su.g: Recognize that the colonists needed help from other countries to win the Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.g: Recognize that other groups (countries) helped the colonists.

SS.5.A.5.8: Evaluate the personal and political hardships resulting from the American Revolution.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to,  financing the war effort, war time inflation, profiteering, loss of family and property, dissent within families and between colonies.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.h: Recognize that there was no money or supplies left for the new government after the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.Su.h: Recognize that the colonists needed more money and supplies after the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.h: Recognize that colonists need supplies.

SS.5.A.5.9: Discuss the impact and significance of land policies developed under the Confederation Congress (Northwest Ordinance of 1787).
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, those listed in the benchmark.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.i: Recognize that the Confederation Congress passed a law (Northwest Ordinance) to allow the United States to expand westward.
SS.5.A.5.Su.i: Recognize that the United States wanted to add new lands after the Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.i: Recognize that the United States grew in size.

SS.5.A.5.10: Examine the significance of the Constitution including its key political concepts, origins of those concepts, and their role in American democracy.
Clarifications:
 Examples may include, but are not limited to, liberty, representative government, limited government, individual rights, "bundle of compromises."
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.5.In.j: Recognize that the Constitution outlines the principles of the American government.
SS.5.A.5.Su.j: Recognize that the Constitution is the set of laws Americans follow.
SS.5.A.5.Pa.j: Recognize that the government makes laws for its people.

SS.5.A.6.1: Describe the causes and effects of the Louisiana Purchase.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.a: Identify the major cause and effect of the Louisiana Purchase.
SS.5.A.6.Su.a: Recognize that the Louisiana Purchase made the United States twice its original size.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.a: Recognize that the United States was made larger by buying land.

SS.5.A.6.2: Identify roles and contributions of significant people during the period of westward expansion.
Clarifications:
 Examples may include, but are not limited to, Lewis and Clark, Sacagawea, York, Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Tecumseh, Jean Baptiste Point Du Sable.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.b: Identify people in the westward expansion and their importance, such as Lewis and Clark, Sacagawea, and Thomas Jefferson.
SS.5.A.6.Su.b: Recognize that Lewis and Clark led an expedition during the westward expansion.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.b: Recognize that people explore new lands.

SS.5.A.6.3: Examine 19th century advancements (canals, roads, steamboats, flat boats, overland wagons, Pony Express, railroads) in transportation and communication.
Clarifications:

In addition to those liseted in the benchmark, examples may include, but are not limited to, the telegraph, Morse Code.

Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.c: Identify advances in transportation and communication in America during the 1800s, such as railroads, steamboats, and the Pony Express.
SS.5.A.6.Su.c: Recognize a change in transportation in America during the 1800s, such as railroads.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.c: Recognize a method of transportation.

SS.5.A.6.4: Explain the importance of the explorations west of the Mississippi River.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, Zebulon Pike, John Fremont, the Mormon migration, the Forty-niners, the Oregon Trail.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.d: Identify contributions of explorers who went west of the Mississippi River, such as creating the first accurate map of the area, including its rivers and mountains.
SS.5.A.6.Su.d: Recognize that Lewis and Clark led an expedition during the westward expansion.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.d: Recognize that people explore new lands.

SS.5.A.6.5: Identify the causes and effects of the War of 1812.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are notl imited to, nationalism, neutrality in trade, impressment, border forts.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.e: Recognize a cause of the War of 1812, such as England kidnapping American sailors, and an effect, such as maintaining control of the land acquired in the Louisiana Purchase.
SS.5.A.6.Su.e: Recognize that America fought England to keep the Mississippi River in the War of 1812.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.e: Recognize that different groups wanted the same land.

SS.5.A.6.6: Explain how westward expansion affected Native Americans.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, the Trail of Tears and Indian Removal Act.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.f: Identify that westward expansion forced Native Americans to leave their homes and caused thousands to die.
SS.5.A.6.Su.f: Recognize that many Native Americans died or lost their homes due to westward expansion.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.f: Recognize that different groups wanted the same land.

SS.5.A.6.7: Discuss the concept of Manifest Destiny.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.g: Recognize that Americans thought it was their right to take lands from the Native Americans to expand across the North American continent.
SS.5.A.6.Su.g: Recognize that many Native Americans died or lost their homes due to westward expansion.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.g: Recognize that different groups wanted the same land.

SS.5.A.6.8: Describe the causes and effects of the Missouri Compromise.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.h: Recognize that the Missouri Compromise led to a dividing line between the South (states that wanted slaves) and North (states that did not want slaves).
SS.5.A.6.Su.h: Recognize that people in the South could own slaves, but people in the North could not.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.h: Recognize that states had different ideas about slavery.

SS.5.A.6.9: Describe the hardships of settlers along the overland trails to the west.
Clarifications:
Examples may include, but are not limited to, location of routes, terrain, rivers, climate, vegetation, conflicts with Native Americans.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.A.6.In.i: Identify hardships that settlers faced as they moved west, such as weather, terrain, and vegetation.
SS.5.A.6.Su.i: Recognize a hardship of settlers moving west, such as poor weather or bad trails.
SS.5.A.6.Pa.i: Recognize a method of travel used by settlers, such as a covered wagon.

SS.5.C.1.1: Explain how and why the United States government was created.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.1.In.a: Identify reasons for creating the United States government, such as to provide services and protection for citizens.
SS.5.C.1.Su.a: Recognize a reason for creating the United States government, such as to provide services or protection for citizens.
SS.5.C.1.Pa.a: Recognize that governments make laws to keep people safe.

SS.5.C.1.2: Define a constitution, and discuss its purposes.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.1.In.b: Recognize that a constitution is the foundation of the laws of a government.
SS.5.C.1.Su.b: Recognize that a constitution is a set of laws.
SS.5.C.1.Pa.b: Recognize that governments make laws to keep people safe.

SS.5.C.1.3: Explain the definition and origin of rights.
Clarifications:
Examples are John Locke's "state of nature" philosophy, natural rights: rights to life, liberty, property.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.1.In.c: Identify examples of natural rights, such as the right to life and freedom.
SS.5.C.1.Su.c: Recognize natural rights, such as the right to life and freedom.
SS.5.C.1.Pa.c: Recognize a right of people, such as freedom.

SS.5.C.1.4: Identify the Declaration of Independence's grievances and Articles of Confederation's weaknesses.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.1.In.d: Identify that the Declaration of Independence included justification for America’s independence.
SS.5.C.1.Su.d: Recognize that the Declaration of Independence included justification for America’s independence.
SS.5.C.1.Pa.d: Recognize a right of people, such as freedom.

SS.5.C.1.5: Describe how concerns about individual rights led to the inclusion of the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.1.In.e: Identify that the Bill of Rights was written to guarantee the individual rights of American citizens.
SS.5.C.1.Su.e: Recognize that the Bill of Rights lists the rights of individuals.
SS.5.C.1.Pa.e: Recognize a right of people, such as freedom.

SS.5.C.1.6: Compare Federalist and Anti-Federalist views of government.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.1.In.f: Identify that some people wanted a strong national government while others wanted strong state governments, such as Federalists and Anti-Federalists.
SS.5.C.1.Su.f: Recognize that people have different views about the power of the United States government.
SS.5.C.1.Pa.f: Recognize that people have different points of view.

SS.5.C.2.1: Differentiate political ideas of Patriots, Loyalists, and "undecideds" during the American Revolution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.2.In.a: Identify the points of view (political ideas) of Patriots and Loyalists during the American Revolution.
SS.5.C.2.Su.a: Recognize the point of view (political ideas) of Patriots during the American Revolution.
SS.5.C.2.Pa.a: Recognize that groups may have different points of view.

SS.5.C.2.2: Compare forms of political participation in the colonial period to today.
Clarifications:
Examples are who participated and how they participated.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.2.In.b: Identify examples of political participation used in the past and today, such as voting, signing petitions, and public protests.
SS.5.C.2.Su.b: Recognize an example of political participation used today, such as voting or contacting representatives.
SS.5.C.2.Pa.b: Recognize that voting is a form of participation.

SS.5.C.2.3: Analyze how the Constitution has expanded voting rights from our nation's early history to today.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.2.In.c: Identify that voting rights were limited early in our nation’s history but expanded to include groups such as former slaves and women.
SS.5.C.2.Su.c: Recognize that some groups of citizens of our nation, such as former slaves and women, could not vote in the past.
SS.5.C.2.Pa.c: Recognize that people can vote in America.

SS.5.C.2.4: Evaluate the importance of civic responsibilities in American democracy.
Clarifications:
Examples are respecting the law, voting, serving on a jury, paying taxes, keeping informed on public issues, protesting.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.2.In.d: Describe the importance of civic responsibilities, such as voting, serving on a jury, and paying taxes.
SS.5.C.2.Su.d: Identify civic responsibilities, such as voting, serving on a jury, and paying taxes.
SS.5.C.2.Pa.d: Recognize a way to be a responsible citizen, such as voting.

SS.5.C.2.5: Identify ways good citizens go beyond basic civic and political responsibilities to improve government and society.
Clarifications:
Examples are running for office, initiating changes in laws or public policy, working on political campaigns, working with others on civic issues.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.2.In.e: Recognize ways that good citizens can become more active in government, such as by running for office and working with others on civic issues.
SS.5.C.2.Su.e: Recognize a way that a good citizen can become more active in government, such as by running for office.
SS.5.C.2.Pa.e: Recognize a way to be a responsible citizen, such as voting.

SS.5.C.3.1: Describe the organizational structure (legislative, executive, judicial branches) and powers of the federal government as defined in Articles I, II, and III of the U.S. Constitution.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.3.In.a: Recognize that the three branches of the United States government have separate powers.
SS.5.C.3.Su.a: Recognize the three branches of the United States government.
SS.5.C.3.Pa.a: Recognize the United States has a government.

SS.5.C.3.2: Explain how popular sovereignty, rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism, and individual rights limit the powers of the federal government as expressed in the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.3.In.b: Identify that the United States Constitution is based on the principle of the separation of powers.
SS.5.C.3.Su.b: Recognize that the United States Constitution specifies the powers of the branches of government.
SS.5.C.3.Pa.b: Recognize the United States has a government.

SS.5.C.3.3: Give examples of powers granted to the federal government and those reserved for the states.
Clarifications:
Examples are coining money, declaring war, creating public schools, making traffic laws.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.3.In.c: Describe a power of the federal government—such as coining money, and a power of the state—such as creating public schools.
SS.5.C.3.Su.c: Identify a power of the federal government—such as coining money, and a power of the state—such as creating public schools.
SS.5.C.3.Pa.c: Recognize that government provides services, such as coining money or creating schools.

SS.5.C.3.4: Describe the amendment process as defined in Article V of the Constitution and give examples.
Clarifications:
Examples are the Bill of Rights and 26th Amendment.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.3.In.d: Recognize that a change to the Constitution (amendment) is created by following specific steps.
SS.5.C.3.Su.d: Recognize that a change to the law is an amendment.
SS.5.C.3.Pa.d: Recognize that a law can be changed.

SS.5.C.3.5: Identify the fundamental rights of all citizens as enumerated in the Bill of Rights.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.3.In.e: Identify rights granted in the Bill of Rights, such as freedom of speech, religion, and assembly.
SS.5.C.3.Su.e: Recognize a right granted in the Bill of Rights, such as freedom of speech or religion.
SS.5.C.3.Pa.e: Recognize that citizens have rights.

SS.5.C.3.6: Examine the foundations of the United States legal system by recognizing the role of the courts in interpreting law and settling conflicts.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.C.3.In.f: Identify the role of the courts in the American legal system in settling conflicts.
SS.5.C.3.Su.f: Recognize that a court settles conflicts between people.
SS.5.C.3.Pa.f: Recognize that conflicts can be settled.

SS.5.E.1.1: Identify how trade promoted economic growth in North America from pre-Columbian times to 1850.
Clarifications:
Examples are Triangular Trade and tobacco.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.E.1.In.a: Identify examples of how people traded with each other in North America from pre-Columbian times to 1850.
SS.5.E.1.Su.a: Recognize that different groups of people traded with each other in North America from pre-Columbian times to 1850.
SS.5.E.1.Pa.a: Recognize that people trade goods and services.

SS.5.E.1.2: Describe a market economy, and give examples of how the colonial and early American economy exhibited these characteristics.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.E.1.In.b: Identify a characteristic of a market economy, such as available resources, demand, or available labor.
SS.5.E.1.Su.b: Recognize that people produce goods that others want to buy (market economy).
SS.5.E.1.Pa.b: Recognize that people trade goods and services.

SS.5.E.1.3: Trace the development of technology and the impact of major inventions on business productivity during the early development of the United States.
Clarifications:
Examples are Franklin stove, bifocals, double sided needle, cotton gin, Turtle submarine.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.E.1.In.c: Identify major inventions during the early development of the United States, such as the Franklin stove, bifocals, and cotton gin.
SS.5.E.1.Su.c: Recognize a major invention during the early development of the United States, such as the Franklin stove, bifocals, or cotton gin.
SS.5.E.1.Pa.c: Identify an invention that helps people, such as a stove.

SS.5.E.2.1: Recognize the positive and negative effects of voluntary trade among Native Americans, European explorers, and colonists.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.E.2.In.a: Recognize examples of voluntary trade between Native Americans, European explorers, and colonists, such as trading crops and furs for guns.
SS.5.E.2.Su.a: Recognize an example of voluntary trade between Native Americans, European explorers, and colonists, such as trading crops and furs for guns.
SS.5.E.2.Pa.a: Recognize that people can trade voluntarily.

SS.5.G.1.1: Interpret current and historical information using a variety of geographic tools.
Clarifications:
Examples are maps, globes, Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.1.In.a: Identify current and historical information using selected geographic tools, such as maps, globes, and satellite images.
SS.5.G.1.Su.a: Recognize current and historical information using selected geographic tools, such as a map, globe, or satellite image.
SS.5.G.1.Pa.a: Recognize information using a selected geographic tool.

SS.5.G.1.2: Use latitude and longitude to locate places.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.1.In.b: Use a coordinate grid on a map to locate places.
SS.5.G.1.Su.b: Use a simple coordinate grid on a drawing to locate features.
SS.5.G.1.Pa.b: Recognize information using a selected geographic tool.

SS.5.G.1.3: Identify major United States physical features on a map of North America.
Clarifications:
Examples are Rocky Mountains, Appalachian Mountains, Mississippi River, Great Lakes, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, Rio Grande, Lake Okeechobee, Mojave Desert.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.1.In.c: Recognize major physical features on a map of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountains, Appalachian Mountains, Mississippi River, Great Lakes, and Lake Okeechobee.
SS.5.G.1.Su.c: Recognize a major physical feature on a map of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountains, Appalachian Mountains, Mississippi River, Great Lakes, or Lake Okeechobee.
SS.5.G.1.Pa.c: Recognize a selected physical feature on a pictorial map of the United States.

SS.5.G.1.4: Construct maps, charts, and graphs to display geographic information.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.1.In.d: Select the format (map, chart, or graph) and display geographic information.
SS.5.G.1.Su.d: Complete a map, chart, or graph to display geographic information.
SS.5.G.1.Pa.d: Complete a pictorial map using pictures or symbols for designated areas.

SS.5.G.1.5: Identify and locate the original thirteen colonies on a map of North America.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.1.In.e: Recognize selected colonies of the original 13 colonies on a map of the United States.
SS.5.G.1.Su.e: Recognize an original colony on a map of the United States.
SS.5.G.1.Pa.e: Recognize a map of North America.

SS.5.G.1.6: Locate and identify states, capitals, and United States Territories on a map.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.1.In.f: Recognize selected states, capitals, and a United States Territory on a map.
SS.5.G.1.Su.f: Recognize selected states and their capitals on a map.
SS.5.G.1.Pa.f: Recognize that the United States is made up of different states.

SS.5.G.2.1: Describe the push-pull factors (economy, natural hazards, tourism, climate, physical features) that influenced boundary changes within the United States.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.2.In.a: Recognize push and pull factors that have influenced boundary changes within the United States, such as job opportunities, climate, and natural hazards.
SS.5.G.2.Su.a: Recognize a push or pull factor that influenced boundary changes within the United States, such as job opportunities, climate, or natural hazards.
SS.5.G.2.Pa.a: Recognize a factor that causes a boundary to change.

SS.5.G.3.1: Describe the impact that past natural events have had on human and physical environments in the United States through 1850.
Clarifications:
An example is the harsh winter in Jamestown.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.3.In.a: Identify an impact of natural events on humans in the United States through 1850, such as the harsh winter in Jamestown.
SS.5.G.3.Su.a: Recognize an impact of natural events on humans in the United States through 1850, such as the harsh winter in Jamestown.
SS.5.G.3.Pa.a: Recognize a natural event that causes change.

SS.5.G.4.1: Use geographic knowledge and skills when discussing current events.
Clarifications:
Examples are recognizing patterns, mapping, graphing.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.4.In.a: Use geographic knowledge and skills to identify information about current events, such as reading maps and charts.
SS.5.G.4.Su.a: Use geographic knowledge and skills to recognize information about current events, such as reading pictorial maps.
SS.5.G.4.Pa.a: Use a geographic tool to recognize information about current events.

SS.5.G.4.2: Use geography concepts and skills such as recognizing patterns, mapping, graphing to find solutions for local, state, or national problems.
Related Access Points
Name Description
SS.5.G.4.In.b: Use geography concepts and skills, such as recognizing patterns and mapping, to identify solutions for local, state, or national problems.
SS.5.G.4.Su.b: Use geography concepts and skills, such as recognizing patterns and mapping, to recognize solutions for selected local, state, or national problems.
SS.5.G.4.Pa.b: Use a geographic tool to recognize information about current events.

LAFS.5.RI.1.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.1.AP.1a: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly.
LAFS.5.RI.1.AP.1b: Quote accurately from a text to support inferences.

LAFS.5.RI.1.2: Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.1.AP.2a: Determine the main ideas of a text.
LAFS.5.RI.1.AP.2b: Identify key details that support the main idea.
LAFS.5.RI.1.AP.2c: Summarize the text read, read aloud or presented in diverse media.

LAFS.5.RI.1.3: Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.1.AP.3a: Identify the relationship between two or more individuals in a historical, scientific or technical text.
LAFS.5.RI.1.AP.3b: Identify the relationship between two or more events of concepts in a historical, scientific or technical text.
LAFS.5.RI.1.AP.3c: Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas or concepts in a historical, scientific or technical text based on specific information in the text.

LAFS.5.RI.2.4: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.2.AP.4a: Determine the meaning of general academic words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
LAFS.5.RI.2.AP.4b: Determine the meaning of domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.

LAFS.5.RI.2.5: Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.2.AP.5a: Use signal words as a means of locating information (e.g., knowing that “because” or “as a result of” may help link a cause to a result).
LAFS.5.RI.2.AP.5b: Use signal word to identify common types of text structure.
LAFS.5.RI.2.AP.5c: Identify the structure of both texts (chronological order, compare/contrast, cause/effect, problem/solution).
LAFS.5.RI.2.AP.5d: Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts or information in two or more texts.

LAFS.5.RI.2.6: Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.2.AP.6a: Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic.
LAFS.5.RI.2.AP.6b: Note similarities and differences in the point of view of multiple accounts of the same event or topic.

LAFS.5.RI.3.7: Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.7a: Locate information from multiple print or digital sources on the same topic.
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.7b: Refer to multiple print or digital sources to locate the answer to a question or solve a problem.
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.7c: Refer to multiple print or digital sources as support for inferences (e.g., how did you know?).

LAFS.5.RI.3.8: Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.8a: Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.8b: Identify reasons and evidence that support an author’s point(s) in a text.
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.8c: Identify the author’s stated thesis/claim/opinion.
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.8d: Identify evidence the author uses to support stated thesis/claim/opinion.

LAFS.5.RI.3.9: Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.9a: Identify key details from multiple sources on the same topic (e.g., what are the important things that you learned?).
LAFS.5.RI.3.AP.9b: Integrate information on a topic from multiple sources to answer a question or support a focus or opinion in writing or presentation.

LAFS.5.RI.4.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.RI.4.AP.10a: Read or listen to a variety of texts including history/social studies, science and technical nonfiction texts.
LAFS.5.RI.4.AP.10b: Use a variety of strategies (e.g., use context, affixes and roots) to derive meaning from a variety of print/non-print texts.

LAFS.5.SL.1.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
  2. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
  3. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
  4. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.1a: Make appropriate comments that contribute to a collaborative discussion.
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.1b: Follow discussion rules and protocols using academic language.
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.1c: Review and respond to the key ideas expressed within a collaborative discussion.
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.1d: Elaborate and build on others' ideas using textual evidence to support their own ideas.

LAFS.5.SL.1.2: Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.2a: Determine the narrative point of view of a text read, read aloud or viewed.
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.2b: Summarize the text or a portion of the text read, read aloud or presented in diverse media.

LAFS.5.SL.1.3: Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.3a: Summarize the points a speaker makes.
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.3b: Identify a speaker’s points or claims.
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.3c: Identify reasons and evidence that a speaker provides to support points or claims.
LAFS.5.SL.1.AP.3d: Explain how at least one perspective in a discussion is supported by reasons and evidence.

LAFS.5.SL.2.4: Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.SL.2.AP.4a: Orally present a topic, story or claim with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details.
LAFS.5.SL.2.AP.4b: Speak clearly and at an understandable pace.
LAFS.5.SL.2.AP.4c: Elaborate on each fact or opinion given in support of a claim with relevant details.

LAFS.5.W.1.1: Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
  1. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
  2. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
  3. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).
  4. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.1a: Provide an introduction that states own opinion within persuasive text.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.1b: Create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s opinion.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.1c: Provide relevant facts to support stated opinion or reasons within persuasive writing.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.1d: Link opinions and reasons using words, phrases and clauses.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.1e: Provide a clear concluding statement or section related to the opinion stated.

LAFS.5.W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  1. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
  3. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.2a: Write an introduction that includes context/background information and establishes a central idea or focus about a topic.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.2b: Organize ideas, concepts and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast and cause/effect.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.2c: Support the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations or other information and examples.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.2d: Include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables) and multimedia appropriate to convey information about the topic.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.2e: Use transitional words, phrases and clauses that connect ideas and create cohesion within writing.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.2f: Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.2g: Provide a concluding statement or section to summarize the information presented.

LAFS.5.W.1.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
  3. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
  4. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.3a: Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.3b: Organize ideas and events so that they unfold naturally.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.3c: Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.3d: Use transitional words, phrases and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.3e: Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.3f: Write a narrative that includes smaller segments of conflict and resolution in the text that contribute to the plot.
LAFS.5.W.1.AP.3g: Provide a conclusion (concluding sentence, paragraph or extended ending) that follows from the narrated events.

LAFS.5.W.2.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.4a: Produce a clear, coherent, permanent product that is appropriate to the specific task (e.g., topic), purpose (e.g., to inform) and audience (e.g., reader).
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.4b: Produce a clear, coherent, permanent product that is appropriate to the specific task, purpose (e.g., to entertain) and audience.
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.4c: Produce a clear, coherent, permanent product (e.g., select/generate responses to form paragraphs or essay) that is appropriate to the specific task, purpose and audience.

LAFS.5.W.2.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.5a: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for narrative writing (e.g., define purpose, state your claim, gather evidence, create your argument, provide a meaningful conclusion).
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.5b: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for informative writing (e.g., choose a topic, introduce story elements, develop storyline, conclude story).
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.5c: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for writing (e.g., determine the topic, gather information, develop the topic, provide a meaningful conclusion).
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.5d: With guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing by revising and editing.
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.5e: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting or trying a new approach.

LAFS.5.W.2.6: With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.6a: Use technology to produce and publish writing (e.g., use the Internet to gather information, use word processing to generate and collaborate on writing).
LAFS.5.W.2.AP.6b: Develop keyboarding skills.

LAFS.5.W.3.7: Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.3.AP.7a: Follow steps to complete a short research project (e.g., determine topic, locate information on a topic, organize information related to the topic, draft a permanent product).

LAFS.5.W.3.8: Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.3.AP.8a: Gather relevant information that relates to a persuasive topic (e.g., highlight in text, quote or paraphrase from text or discussion) from print and/or digital sources.
LAFS.5.W.3.AP.8b: Gather relevant information that relates to a topic or idea within a story (e.g., highlight in text, quote or paraphrase from text) from print and/or digital sources.
LAFS.5.W.3.AP.8c: Gather information that relates to an informational topic or subject (e.g., highlight, quote or paraphrase from source) relevant to the topic from print and/or digital sources.
LAFS.5.W.3.AP.8d: Provide a list of sources that contributed to the content within a writing piece.

LAFS.5.W.3.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  1. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]”).
  2. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]”).
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.3.AP.9a: Draw evidence from literary text to support an analysis or reflection.
LAFS.5.W.3.AP.9b: Draw evidence from informational text to support an analysis, reflection or research.

LAFS.5.W.4.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Related Access Points
Name Description
LAFS.5.W.4.AP.10a: Write routinely over shorter time frames (e.g., journal entry, letter, graphic organizer) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.
LAFS.5.W.4.AP.10b: Write routinely in a genre over extended time frames (planning, drafting, editing, revising, publishing) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.

MAFS.K12.MP.1.1:

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1:

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.5.1: Use appropriate tools strategically.

Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
MAFS.K12.MP.6.1:

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1: English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.
HE.5.C.2.4: Give examples of school and public health policies that influence health promotion and disease prevention.
Clarifications:
Head-lice guidelines, seat-belt and child-restraint laws, helmet laws, fire/severe weather/lockdown drills, school-bus rules, and immunization requirements.
Related Access Points
Name Description
HE.5.C.2.In.d: Identify selected school and public-health policies that influence health promotion and disease prevention, such as head-lice guidelines, seat-belt laws, fire drills, and school-bus rules.
HE.5.C.2.Su.d: Recognize school and public-health policies that influence health promotion and disease prevention, such as head-lice guidelines, seat-belt laws, fire drills, and school-bus rules.
HE.5.C.2.Pa.d: Recognize ways the school influences health practices of children, such as offering after-school activities, community safety-education programs, a variety of nutritious foods at lunch, and bus-safety rules.




General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/ss.pdf.


General Information

Course Number: 7721016 Course Path: Section: Exceptional Student Education > Grade Group: Elementary > Subject: Academics - Subject Areas >
Abbreviated Title: ACCESS SOC ST - 5
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 5



Educator Certifications

Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Exceptional Student Education (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Mentally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6)
Varying Exceptionalities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Emotionally Handicapped (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Social Science (Grades 5-9)
Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12) Plus Elementary Education (Grades K-6)
Elementary Education (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Studies (Elementary Grades 1-6) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Science (Grades 5-9) Plus Specific Learning Disabilities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


There are more than 285 related instructional/educational resources available for this on CPALMS. Click on the following link to access them: https://cpalms.org/PreviewCourse/Preview/15474