Humanities 2 Honors (#0900315) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
LAFS.910.RH.1.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
LAFS.910.RH.1.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
LAFS.910.RH.1.3: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
LAFS.910.RH.2.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
LAFS.910.RH.2.5: Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.
LAFS.910.RH.2.6: Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
LAFS.910.RH.3.7: Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
LAFS.910.RH.3.8: Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author’s claims.
LAFS.910.RH.3.9: Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
LAFS.910.RH.4.10: By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
LAFS.910.SL.1.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
LAFS.910.SL.1.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
LAFS.910.SL.1.3: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
LAFS.910.SL.2.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
LAFS.910.SL.2.5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
LAFS.910.WHST.1.1: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  1. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  2. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.
LAFS.910.WHST.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
  1. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
LAFS.910.WHST.2.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.910.WHST.2.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
LAFS.910.WHST.2.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.9: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.910.WHST.4.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
SS.912.H.1.1: Relate works in the arts (architecture, dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) of varying styles and genre according to the periods in which they were created.
Clarifications:
Examples are Bronze Age, Ming Dynasty, Classical, Renaissance, Modern, and Contemporary.
SS.912.H.1.2: Describe how historical events, social context, and culture impact forms, techniques, and purposes of works in the arts, including the relationship between a government and its citizens.
Clarifications:
Examples are imperial Roman sculpture; Palace of Versailles; Picasso's Guernica; layout of Washington, DC.
SS.912.H.1.3: Relate works in the arts to various cultures.
Clarifications:
Examples are African, Asian, Oceanic, European, the Americas, Middle Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman.
SS.912.H.3.2: Identify social, moral, ethical, religious, and legal issues arising from technological and scientific developments, and examine their influence on works of arts within a culture.
SS.912.W.4.2: Recognize major influences on the architectural, artistic, and literary developments of Renaissance Italy (Classical, Byzantine, Islamic, Western European).
SS.912.W.4.4: Identify characteristics of Renaissance humanism in works of art.
Clarifications:
Examples are influence of classics, School of Athens.
SS.912.W.4.5: Describe how ideas from the Middle Ages and Renaissance led to the Scientific Revolution.
SS.912.W.5.4: Evaluate the impact of Enlightenment ideals on the development of economic, political, and religious structures in the Western world.
TH.912.C.1.4: Research and define the physical/visual elements necessary to create theatrical reality for a specific historical and/or geographical play.
Clarifications:
e.g., architectural details; period costumes, furnishings, and hair; attire appropriate to climate and time of year; props appropriate to economic level
TH.912.H.1.1: Analyze how playwrights’ work reflects the cultural and socio-political framework in which it was created.
TH.912.H.2.1: Research the correlations between theatrical forms and the social, cultural, historical, and political climates from which they emerged, to form an understanding of the influences that have shaped theatre.
MU.912.H.1.1: Investigate and discuss how a culture’s traditions are reflected through its music.
Clarifications:
e.g., patriotic, folk, celebration, entertainment, spiritual
MU.912.H.2.1: Evaluate the social impact of music on specific historical periods.
DA.912.H.2.1: Survey cultural trends and historically significant events, in parallel with the history of dance, to understand how each helped shape dance as an art form.
Clarifications:
e.g., court dances on ballet, West African dance on modern, dance artist, society, music, costuming, sets, technology, venues
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.
VA.912.H.1.1: Analyze the impact of social, ecological, economic, religious, and/or political issues on the function or meaning of the artwork.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

The purpose of this course is to enable students to examine, understand, and respond to creative efforts of individuals and societies through interdisciplinary study of the arts and their connections to areas such as history, literature, philosophy, and religion since 1500, including the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment, among others.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • characteristics of the visual and performing arts
  • influence of history, literature, philosophy, and religion on the arts
  • analysis of ideas and artistic expression across varied cultures
  • contributions of major visual and performing arts
  • impact of history and culture on today's societies and cultures

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

Instructional Practices:  Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason.  Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning:

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

 


English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/si.pdf


QUALIFICATIONS

As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

Any academic coverage (any coverage classified as an academic coverage in Rules 6A-4.0101 through 6A-4.0343, Florida Administrative Code).


General Information

Course Number: 0900315 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Humanities > SubSubject: General >
Abbreviated Title: HUM 2 HON
Number of Credits: Half credit (.5)
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Elective Course Course Level: 3
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12



Educator Certifications

Humanities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Science (Grades 6-12)
English (Grades 6-12)
Drama (Grades 6-12)
Art Education (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Music (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Art (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


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