Musical Theatre 2 (#0400710) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
TH.912.C.1.5: Make and defend conscious choices in the creation of a character that will fulfill anticipated audience response.
TH.912.C.1.6: Respond to theatrical works by identifying and interpreting influences of historical, social, or cultural contexts.
TH.912.C.1.7: Justify personal perceptions of a director’s vision and/or playwright’s intent.
TH.912.C.2.1: Explore and describe possible solutions to production or acting challenges and select the solution most likely to produce desired results.
TH.912.C.2.5: Analyze the effect of rehearsal sessions and/or strategies on refining skills and techniques by keeping a performance or rehearsal journal/log.
TH.912.C.2.7: Accept feedback from others, analyze it for validity, and apply suggestions appropriately to future performances or designs.
TH.912.C.2.8: Improve a performance or project using various self-assessment tools, coaching, feedback, and/or constructive criticism.
Clarifications:
e.g., peer assessment, rubric, criteria, coaching, feedback, criticism
TH.912.C.3.2: Develop and apply criteria to select works for a portfolio and defend one’s artistic choices with a prepared analysis.
TH.912.C.3.3: Critique, based on exemplary models and established criteria, the production values and effectiveness of school, community, and live or recorded professional productions.
TH.912.F.1.1: Synthesize research, analysis, and imagination to create believable characters and settings.
Clarifications:
e.g., scenery, costumes, props
TH.912.F.2.1: Create and maintain a portfolio for a variety of college or job interviews that can be customized for each opportunity.
Clarifications:
e.g., body of work, references, résumé, artist statement
TH.912.F.2.2: Assess the skills needed for theatre-related jobs in the community to support career selection.
TH.912.F.3.3: Exhibit independence, discipline, and commitment to the theatre process when working on assigned projects and productions.
TH.912.F.3.6: Examine how skills used in putting on a production can be applied in the general work place and design a résumé showing marketable skills for a college or job application.
Clarifications:
e.g., time management, organization, public speaking, creative writing, leadership, collaboration, design, construction, business management, accounting
TH.912.H.1.1: Analyze how playwrights’ work reflects the cultural and socio-political framework in which it was created.
TH.912.H.1.2: Study, rehearse, and discuss a broad range of theatre works by diverse playwrights to enrich one’s perspective of the world.
TH.912.H.1.4: Interpret a text through different social, cultural, and historical lenses to consider how perspective and context shape a work and its characters.
TH.912.H.1.5: Respect the rights of performers and audience members to perform or view controversial work with sensitivity to school and community standards.
TH.912.H.2.1: Research the correlations between theatrical forms and the social, cultural, historical, and political climates from which they emerged, to form an understanding of the influences that have shaped theatre.
TH.912.H.2.2: Research and discuss the effects of personal experience, culture, and current events that shape individual response to theatrical works.
TH.912.H.2.3: Weigh and discuss, based on analysis of dramatic texts, the importance of cultural protocols and historical accuracy for artistic impact.
TH.912.H.2.8: Analyze how events have been portrayed through theatre and film, balancing historical accuracy versus theatrical storytelling.
TH.912.H.2.9: Create scenes that satirize current political or social events.
Clarifications:
e.g., improvise, script, perform
TH.912.H.2.10: Analyze how the history of American musical theatre is tied to events in U.S. history and popular culture, detailing the ways in which theatre evolved.
TH.912.H.2.11: Describe the significant works and major contributions of major playwrights, performers, designers, directors, and producers in American musical theatre.
TH.912.H.3.3: Apply knowledge of non-theatre content areas to enhance presentations of characters, environments, and actions in performance.
Clarifications:
e.g., history, literature, visual art, welding, sewing, computer applications, math, science, world languages
TH.912.H.3.4: Create a routine of wellness and care for the actor’s physical being as a performance instrument.
TH.912.O.1.1: Research and analyze a dramatic text by breaking it down into its basic, structural elements to support development of a directorial concept, characterization, and design.
Clarifications:
e.g., beats, actions, subtext
TH.912.O.1.2: Compare the conventions of western theatre with eastern theatre practices.
Clarifications:
e.g., puppetry, masks, stage space, symbolism
TH.912.O.1.3: Execute the responsibilities of director, designer, manager, technician, or performer by applying standard theatrical conventions.
TH.912.O.1.4: Write an original script or a dramatic adaptation of a literary work to demonstrate knowledge of theatrical conventions.
TH.912.S.1.3: Develop criteria that may be applied to the selection and performance of theatrical work.
Clarifications:
e.g., appropriate to available actors, budget, venue, appropriate to community values
TH.912.S.1.4: Compare the artistic content as described by playwrights, actors, designers, and/or directors with the final artistic product and assess the success of the final artistic product using established criteria.
Clarifications:
e.g., empathy, aesthetic distance, historical accuracy, personal or cultural perspective, social issues
TH.912.S.1.6: Respond appropriately to directorial choices for improvised and scripted scenes.
TH.912.S.1.8: Use research to extract clues in dramatic texts to create performances or technical elements, choosing those that are most interesting and that best convey dramatic intent.
Clarifications:
e.g., cultural, historical, symbolic, interpretive
TH.912.S.2.3: Demonstrate an understanding of a dramatic work by developing a character analysis for one or more of its major characters and show how the analysis clarifies the character’s physical and emotional dimensions.
Clarifications:
e.g., relationships, wants, needs, motivations
TH.912.S.2.4: Sustain a character or follow technical cues in a production piece to show focus.
TH.912.S.2.5: Perform memorized theatrical literature in contrasting pieces to show ability to apply principles and structure, focus on details of performance, and processing skills to establish successful interpretation, expression, and believability.
TH.912.S.2.6: Transfer acting and technical skills and techniques from one piece of dramatic text to another.
TH.912.S.3.1: Articulate, based on research, the rationale for artistic choices in casting, staging, or technical design for a scene from original or scripted material.
TH.912.S.3.2: Exercise artistic discipline and collaboration to achieve ensemble in rehearsal and performance.
TH.912.S.3.3: Develop acting skills and techniques in the rehearsal process.
LAFS.910.L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  1. Use parallel structure.
  2. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

LAFS.910.RL.2.5: Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
LAFS.910.RST.1.3: Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks, attending to special cases or exceptions defined in the text.
LAFS.910.RST.2.4: Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9–10 texts and topics.
LAFS.910.SL.1.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

LAFS.910.SL.1.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
LAFS.910.SL.1.3: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
LAFS.910.SL.2.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.9: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
MAFS.K12.MP.5.1: Use appropriate tools strategically.

Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.K12.MP.6.1:

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MAFS.K12.MP.7.1:

Look for and make use of structure.

Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression x² + 9x + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(x – y)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers x and y.

Standard Relation to Course: Supporting

MU.912.C.2.1: Evaluate and make appropriate adjustments to personal performance in solo and ensembles.
MU.912.O.3.2: Interpret and perform expressive elements indicated by the musical score and/or conductor.
MU.912.S.2.2: Transfer expressive elements and performance techniques from one piece of music to another.
DA.912.C.2.1: Analyze movement from varying perspectives and experiment with a variety of creative solutions to solve technical or choreographic challenges.
Clarifications:
e.g., improvisation, trial and error, collaboration
DA.912.S.1.2: Generate choreographic ideas through improvisation and physical brainstorming.
PE.912.C.2.3: Analyze the movement performance of self and others.
Clarifications:
Some examples are video analysis and checklist.
PE.912.M.1.5: Apply strategies for self improvement based on individual strengths and needs.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.



General Course Information and Notes

VERSION DESCRIPTION

Students learn from the styles and techniques used by well-known singer-actor-dancers and choreographers to build a performance portfolio for auditions and/or interviews. Students examine the contributions of major writers, composers, lyricists, and choreographers of musical theatre and learn to analyze the structures, stories, and settings of musical theatre exemplars to understand how those components serve the story and concept. Students extend their dance and movement techniques required to sing and dance at the same time. Public performances may serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals. Students may be required to attend and/or participate in rehearsals and performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.

GENERAL NOTES


English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/si.pdf


General Information

Course Number: 0400710 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Drama - Theatre Arts > SubSubject: General >
Abbreviated Title: MUSIC THEATRE 2
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Attributes:
  • Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Required
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Core Academic Course Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12
Graduation Requirement: Performing/Fine Arts



Educator Certifications

English (Grades 6-12)
Speech (Grades 6-12)
Dance (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Drama (Grades 6-12)
Music (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Instrumental Music (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Instrumental Music (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


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