Humanities Survey (#0900300) 


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Course Standards

Name Description
LAFS.910.RH.1.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
LAFS.910.RH.2.6: Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
LAFS.910.RH.3.7: Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
LAFS.910.SL.1.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  2. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
  3. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
  4. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
LAFS.910.SL.1.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
LAFS.910.SL.1.3: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
LAFS.910.SL.2.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
LAFS.910.SL.2.5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
LAFS.910.WHST.2.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
LAFS.910.WHST.3.9: Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
SS.912.H.1.1: Relate works in the arts (architecture, dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) of varying styles and genre according to the periods in which they were created.
Clarifications:
Examples are Bronze Age, Ming Dynasty, Classical, Renaissance, Modern, and Contemporary.
SS.912.H.1.2: Describe how historical events, social context, and culture impact forms, techniques, and purposes of works in the arts, including the relationship between a government and its citizens.
Clarifications:
Examples are imperial Roman sculpture; Palace of Versailles; Picasso's Guernica; layout of Washington, DC.
SS.912.H.1.3: Relate works in the arts to various cultures.
Clarifications:
Examples are African, Asian, Oceanic, European, the Americas, Middle Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman.
SS.912.H.1.4: Explain philosophical beliefs as they relate to works in the arts.
Clarifications:
Examples are classical architecture, protest music, Native American dance, Japanese Noh.
SS.912.H.1.5: Examine artistic response to social issues and new ideas in various cultures.
Clarifications:
Examples are Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, Langston Hughes' poetry, Pete Seeger's Bring 'Em Home.
SS.912.H.1.6: Analyze how current events are explained by artistic and cultural trends of the past.
SS.912.H.1.7: Know terminology of art forms (narthex, apse, triforium of Gothic cathedral) within cultures and use appropriately in oral and written references.
SS.912.H.2.4: Examine the effects that works in the arts have on groups, individuals, and cultures.
VA.912.C.1.6: Identify rationale for aesthetic choices in recording visual media.
Clarifications:
e.g., two-, three-, and four-dimensional media, motion or multi-media
VA.912.H.1.1: Analyze the impact of social, ecological, economic, religious, and/or political issues on the function or meaning of the artwork.
VA.912.H.1.3: Examine the significance placed on art forms over time by various groups or cultures compared to current views on aesthetics.
VA.912.H.1.8: Analyze and compare works in context, considering economic, social, cultural, and political issues, to define the significance and purpose of art.
Clarifications:
e.g., patronage, authority, iconography, gender, semiotics, deconstruction
VA.912.H.1.9: Describe the significance of major artists, architects, or masterworks to understand their historical influences.
VA.912.H.1.10: Describe and analyze the characteristics of a culture and its people to create personal art reflecting daily life and/or the specified environment.
Clarifications:
e.g., belief system, ecology, environment, current visual culture, economy
MAFS.K12.MP.1.1:

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1:

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.5.1: Use appropriate tools strategically.

Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.
MAFS.K12.MP.6.1:

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

MU.912.H.1.1: Investigate and discuss how a culture’s traditions are reflected through its music.
Clarifications:
e.g., patriotic, folk, celebration, entertainment, spiritual
MU.912.H.1.4: Analyze how Western music has been influenced by historical and current world cultures.
MU.912.H.2.1: Evaluate the social impact of music on specific historical periods.
MU.912.H.2.3: Analyze the evolution of a music genre.
Clarifications:
e.g., jazz, blues
TH.912.H.1.1: Analyze how playwrights’ work reflects the cultural and socio-political framework in which it was created.
TH.912.H.1.4: Interpret a text through different social, cultural, and historical lenses to consider how perspective and context shape a work and its characters.
TH.912.H.2.2: Research and discuss the effects of personal experience, culture, and current events that shape individual response to theatrical works.
ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1: English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.



General Course Information and Notes

GENERAL NOTES

The purpose of this course is to enable students to survey major creative expressions of the cultural heritage of selected civilizations through study of the arts and their connections to areas such as literature, history, philosophy, and religion. Emphasis will be on the impact of cultural heritage on contemporary society and culture.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
  • Reflection of culture through the visual and performing arts
  • Influence of historical events on the development of various civilizations
  • Effect of history and culture on today's societies
Special Notes:

Instructional Practices
Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning:
  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).


English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/si.pdf


QUALIFICATIONS

As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

Any academic coverage (any coverage classified as an academic coverage in Rules 6A-4.0101 through 6A-4.0343, Florida Administrative Code).


General Information

Course Number: 0900300 Course Path: Section: Grades PreK to 12 Education Courses > Grade Group: Grades 9 to 12 and Adult Education Courses > Subject: Humanities > SubSubject: General >
Abbreviated Title: HUM SURV
Number of Credits: Half credit (.5)
Course Attributes:
  • Florida Standards Course
Course Type: Elective Course Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12



Educator Certifications

Humanities (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Social Science (Grades 5-9)
English (Grades 6-12)
Drama (Grades 6-12)
Art Education (Secondary Grades 7-12)
Music (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)
Art (Elementary and Secondary Grades K-12)


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